Physical Activity & The Improvements on Mental Health

Physical Activity & The Improvements on Mental Health

by: Emily Lopez

Mental health has a lot to do with the way we think, feel, and act in our everyday lives. Because of this it is important to maintain a good state of mind so that it does not affect our well-being. Performing any type of physical activity is known to show improvements on mental health, whether that is through running, walking, going to the gym, biking, playing sports, gardening, etc. Many people like to stay active for many different reasons such as maintaining a healthy lifestyle, certain fitness goals they may have that they want to accomplish, or simply because they enjoy it and it makes them feel good, both physically and mentally.

Research shows that the reason why majority of people perform physical activity is either because they want to stay healthy or it makes them feel good about themselves. According to a study that was done, people who deal with depression are far more likely to be more physically inactive than the general population, placing them at higher risks of long-term poor physical health (Parker, 2019). Overtime those who participated in physical activity resulted in lower levels of anxiety and depression than those who were not active at all. Not only does physical activity benefit one’s health and increase mood, but it also increases self-esteem.

Source: https://images.app.goo.gl/wVMGTsM1c3NmMont5

Physical activity is important to incorporate into one’s lifestyle based on the many different benefits it provides for our health and well-being. If it something that allows us to be able to feel and look good about ourselves, then why not? You can do this by going out and enjoying something you love doing that involves being active, whether that is indoors/outdoors or through leisure or recreational activity, you decide.

Source: https://images.app.goo.gl/xAZdf929v6Hed4uv7

Infographic on Mental Health and Exercise: mental health and ex

 

References

Hamer, M., Stamatakis, E., & Steptoe, A. (2009). Dose-response relationship between physical activity and mental health: The scottish health survey. British Journal of Sports Medicine, 43(14), 1111. https://dx.doi.org.vortex3.uco.edu/10.1136/bjsm.2008.046243

White, R.L., Babic, M.J., Parker, P.D., Lubans, D.R., Astell-Burt, T., & Lonsdale, C. (2017). Domain-specific physical activity and mental health: A meta-analysis. American Journal of Preventive Medicine52(5), 653–666. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2016.12.008

Assistant Professor, Kinesiology and Health Studies department