Tag: undergraduate research

Apply Now for the Jones Harris Endowed Public Service Scholarship, Due June 1

Are you interested in pursuing a job in public service and have a desire to change the world? Do you have strong leadership skills and are committed to enrolling in graduate or professional school?

Apply for the Jones Harris Scholarship! This scholarship supports a sophomore or junior student at UCO who plans to apply for the national Truman Scholars program, a national award that funds graduate studies for students planning on a career in public service.

This is a highly competitive scholarship with the winner receiving up to a one-year, $10,000 award. The scholarship recipient will be required to prepare an application for the Truman Scholars program, which will be due in February 2023.

Criteria:

  1. Full-time sophomore-level standing during the time of application and a strong commitment to attending a graduate or professional school after graduation (juniors may apply if they are 18 months from graduation).
  2. Preference given to a political science major, but the priority is a student pursuing a career in public service, which is broadly defined as government, education, the nonprofit sector or public interest/advocacy.
  3. Minimum 3.0 cumulative GPA.
  4. Candidate should have evidence of high academic performance and a strong leadership potential.
  5. Applicant should be active in high school and college activities in the school and in the community.
  6. Experience in internships and/or part-time jobs is preferred.
  7. Intent to apply for a Truman Scholarship during the junior year.
  8. Students currently completing their associate’s degree at a community college are eligible to apply during their sophomore year but must be a UCO student to receive any funds during the junior year.
  9. Candidate is required to take a one hour course in the fall in preparation for the Truman Scholarship application.

Additional finalists will also be selected from this application process to join a one hour class during the fall semester of the junior year to begin preparation for the Truman Scholarship Application and other national awards.

Apply online via: https://tinyurl.com/jonesharris

For more information email Michael Springer, Ph.D., director of the Office of High-Impact Practices.

Join the Central Undergraduate Research Board

The Central Undergraduate Research Board (CURB) is a small group of student leaders on campus who serve as an advisory board promoting undergraduate research, creative, and scholarly activity at UCO. The board consists of 5-10 members representing the university’s five colleges, and works with the Office of High-Impact Practices to engage students and to plan for future growth in undergraduate research. Students from all disciplines are encouraged to apply.

CURB’s mission is to:

  • Promote undergraduate research, creative, and scholarly opportunities;
  • Collaborate with other student groups on campus to get the word out about research, creative, and scholarly opportunities and their benefits to students;
  • Contribute to the conversation about expanding opportunities to our diverse student body;
  • And provide a student voice to advise OHIP on student polices, practices, resources, and services

Undergraduate students can apply to serve on CURB through a nomination process. To nominate yourself or someone else, please send an email to Dr. Michael Springer, Director of the Office of High-Impact Practices at mspringer@uco.edu. In the email, be sure to include the nominee’s name and answers to the following three questions.

  • Why do you think undergraduate research is important?
  • What would you like to do to promote undergraduate research experiences at UCO?
  • What does diversity, equity, and inclusion mean to you and why are these important in undergraduate research?

Students and faculty can nominate any undergraduate student to serve on the advisory board. The deadline to nominate is Friday, September 10, 2021. Students selected to serve on the board will be notified by Friday, September 17, 2021.

Benefits for advisory board members include a voice in decisions about undergraduate research programs, leadership opportunities, as well as network building and community outreach. It is a chance to impact undergraduate research, creative, and scholarly activities for other students at UCO.

Serving on the advisory board is a voluntary position, with an estimated time commitment of five hours per month. The term of appointment is for the academic year 2021-2022.

If you are interested, submit a nominating email to mspringer@uco.edu today!

Meet the Researchers – Veronica Fuxa and Vincent Pinion

Meet UCO students Veronica Fuxa, Senior English Education Major, and Vincent Pinion, Senior Master’s Student in Experimental Psychology. Their faculty mentor is Dr. Anastasia Wickham. Veronica got involved in her research through preparing to student-teach. She noticed how some teachers reacted towards technology usage such as Google Classroom and Chromebooks. “In my education courses, we learn about different technologies, but we are never sure which ones are effective in the classroom since we did not have any experience. I wanted to analyze teachers’ reactions towards ‘essential technologies’ and use quantitative analysis to determine different groups’ attitudes towards classroom technology.”

Meet the Researcher – Savannah Melher

Due to circumstances surrounding COVID-19, University of Central Oklahoma student researchers were unable to present at the National Conference on Undergraduate Research. In the next few weeks, we will be highlighting some of these phenomenal students and their research.

Savannah MelherFirst is Savannah Melher, a Senior Strategic Communications Major with Dr. Mary Carver as her faculty advisor. She got involved in undergraduate research through the McNair Scholars program on Campus. Savannah was invited to the 2020 NCUR Conference to present her research, “Reporting in Race: the Depiction of Black Oklahomans.” The purpose of the study is to research depictions of race in the media. Prior studies focused on politics and how news stories favor one candidate over another or how the media favors a political party, thus addressing how the media can be a tool for gaining political preference. Savannah concludes in the present study that the same can be said regarding race depiction in the news media.