Scholars of Color, by Faculty Rank

Bar chart showing percentage breakout for People of Color compared to White People among faculty in U.S. higher education at each rank: Professor, Assoc. Prof., Assistant Prof., Instructor, Lecturer, No Academic Rank. People of Color held 36% of faculty positions at the Ass't Prof level, but only 22% at Full Prof level. Data from fall 2018.Bar chart showing percentage breakout for People of Color compared to White People among faculty in U.S. higher education at each rank: Professor, Assoc. Prof., Assistant Prof., Instructor, Lecturer, No Academic Rank. People of Color held 36% of faculty positions at the Ass’t Prof level, but only 22% at Full Prof level. Data from fall 2018.

Book Clubs and Workshops, Spring 2021

Twenty-eight UCO faculty submitted applications for 21CPI events. All submissions include why the event leads to teaching effectiveness. Participants submit an artifact incorporating learning from the event, as well as write a critical reflection. This spring, facilitators originate from every UCO college (i.e., chemistry, curriculum and instruction, design, English, finance, history and geography, leadership, management, mass communication, music, nursing, and adult education and safety science) and Student Success, Engagement, and Undergraduate Admissions.

A benefit of going online with our faculty development opportunities is that we can have more events for less cost.  These savings come from not having any food or supplies for on-campus events, especially the Annual Collegium and the New and Adjunct Faculty Orientations. As requested by participants, we now note whether facilitators describe their role as co-learners or knowledgeable about the topic. Furthermore, we now indicate the area of pedagogy that it includes.


SPECIAL EVENTS

Photo of Nick WalkerThe Neurodiversity Paradigm: An Introduction

3-4:30 p.m. Jan. 29, 2021, via Zoom

Join Nick Walker, Ph.D., a leading thinker in the emerging field of neurodiversity studies, for a brief introduction to the concept of neurodiversity and the neurodiversity paradigm, which has emerged over the past two decades to challenge conventional pathology-oriented approaches to autism and other minority neurocognitive styles.

Walker is a queer, autistic author, educator, scholar and activist. She is an associate professor of psychology at California Institute of Integral Studies and co-founder and managing editor of the indie publishing house, Autonomous Press. Pedagogy: neurodiversity, critical psychology, privilege

Effective Teaching and Assessment Strategies for the Extended Classroom

Are you charged with teaching both remote students and in-class students simultaneously and wondering how to make it work? This workshop series equips faculty with practical, effective strategies to improve teaching and learning in an extended classroom environment. Each 90-minute workshop draws on cognitive science.

Kristi RudengaKristi Rudenga, Ph.D., is the director of Teaching Excellence at the Notre Dame Kaneb Center for Teaching Excellence. She earned her Ph.D. in neuroscience from Yale University before serving as associate director of the Yale Teaching Center. She played a key strategic and training role in the 2020 pivot to remote teaching and, subsequently, to dual-mode teaching at Notre Dame.

Photo of Alex Ambrose

Alex Ambrose, Ph.D., serves as a professor of the practice role in ND Learning | Kaneb Center for Teaching Excellence and teaches in the Education, Schooling and Society and ACE Masters of Education programs. His Ph.D. is in computing technology in education. He has been an online instructor and trainer to online instructors for more than 10 years. Ambrose was also one of the lead trainers for the early spring COVID-19 emergency and remote-teaching push.

 

Session I: 1:30-3 p.m. Feb. 11, 2021, via Zoom
Flexible Teaching I: Using Zoom to Promote Student Learning

Session II: 1:30-3 p.m. Feb. 25, 2021, via Zoom
Flexible Assessment: Alternative Assessments & Exam (Re)Design

Session III: 1:30-3 p.m. March 11, 2021, via Zoom
Flexible Teaching II: Strategies for Effective Active Learning & Group Collaboration

Session IV: 1:30-3 p.m. March 25, 2021, via Zoom
Flexible Assessment II: Participation, Preparation and Attendance

Pedagogy: engagement, active learning, course design

21CPI Awards with Guest Speaker Christine Harrington

Photo of Christine HarringtonThe 21st Century Pedagogy Institute’s faculty participants will be recognized prior to Christine Harrington, Ph.D.’s, presentation. Registrants will be eligible for many prizes, including the main prize of an iPad Mini.
2-4:30 p.m. Feb. 5, 2021

Dynamic Lecturing
Discover research-based strategies on how to maximize the effectiveness of your lectures, increasing student engagement and learning. After attending this high-energy and interactive session, you’ll walk away with many practical strategies that you can begin incorporating into your lectures immediately.

Pedagogy: engagement, active learning, dynamic lecturing


BOOK GROUPS

How to Respond in a Pandemic: 25 Ideas from 25 Disciplines of Study Edited by Joan Ferrante and Chris Caldeira

Facilitator as Co-Learner: Leeda Copley, Sociology, Gerontology, SAS
Noon-1:15 p.m. | Jan. 22, 29 and Feb. 5, 12, via Zoom

Pedagogy: engagement, active learning, inclusivity

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The Mismeasure of Man by Stephen Jay Gould

Facilitator as Co-Learner: Shawna Ellis, Chemistry
12:30-1:30 p.m. | Jan. 25, Feb. 15, March 15 and April 19, via Zoom

Pedagogy: Bell Curve, measuring, student learning

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Beyond the Binary: Gender Identities, Gender Fluidity, and Classroom Pedagogy Book Series by J. Twist, B. Vincent, M.J. Baker and K. Gupta and by M. Rajunov, S. Duane

Facilitator as Co-Learner: J. David Macey, English
A Series: 2-3:15 p.m. | Jan. 25, Feb. 8, 22, via Zoom
B Series: 2-3:15 p.m. | March 15, 29 and April 12, via Zoom

Pedagogy:  intersecting identities, neurodiversity, inclusivity

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Small Teaching Online: Applying Learning Science in Online Classes by Flower Darby with James M. Lang

Facilitator as Co-Learner: Lora Pezzell, CeCE
12:30-2 p.m. | Jan. 26, Feb. 23 and March 16, via Zoom

Pedagogy: backward design, motivation, engagement

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Neuroteach: Brain Science and the Future of Education by Glenn Whitman and Ian Kelleher

Facilitators with Knowledge: Chindarat Charoenwongse-Shaw, Music | Kristen Gregory, CeCE | Pamela Rollins, Kathlynn Smith, Nursing | Samantha Kramer, Enrollment and Student Success
10:30 a.m.-noon | Feb. 2, 16, March 2, 30, via Zoom

Pedagogy: brain-based research principles, aligning learning and teaching, neuroscience

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Teaching about Race and Racism in the College Classroom Notes from a White Professor by Cyndi Kernahan

Facilitator as Co-Learner: Jerry Green, Humanities and Philosophy
2-3:15 p.m. | Feb. 2, 9, 16 and 23, via Zoom

Pedagogy:  learning environments, social context, critical thinking

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Culturally Responsive Teaching & the Brain: Promoting Authentic Engagement and Rigor Among Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Students by Zaretta L. Hammond

Facilitator as Co-Learner: Darlinda Cassel, Curriculum and Instruction

Noon-12:45 p.m. | Feb. 3, 24, March 3, 17, via Zoom

Pedagogy: learning environments, student learning outcomes, critique memorization

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Sentipensante (Sensing/Thinking) Pedagogy: Educating for Wholeness, Social Justice and Liberation by Laura I. Rendón

Facilitators as Co-Learners: Yadira Reyes-Peña, Trevor Cox, AESS
1:30-2:30 p.m. | Feb. 3, 16, March 2, via Zoom

Pedagogy: connecting affective and cognitive domain, social justice, liberation

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Tulsa, 1921: Reporting a Massacre by Randy Krehbiel

Facilitators with knowledge: Anastasia Wickham, Leslie Similly, English
2:30-3:30 p.m. | Feb. 3, 17, March 3, 17, via Zoom

Pedagogy: transfer, social context, inclusivity

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Oklahomo: Lessons in Unqueering America by Carol Mason

Facilitators with Knowledge: John Stephens, Undergraduate Admissions | Lindsey Churchill, History and Geography
1:30-2:45 p.m. | Feb. 4, 18, March 4, 18, via Zoom

Pedagogy: transfer, social context, inclusivity

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The Synergistic Classroom: Interdisciplinary Teaching in the Small College Setting Edited by Corey Campion and Aaron Angello
Especially for CLA faculty

Facilitators with Knowledge: Shun Y. Kiang, English | Leeda Copley, Sociology, Gerontology, SAS
11:00-12:30 p.m. | Feb. 5, 19, March 5, 19, via Zoom

Pedagogy: interdisciplinary pedagogy, challenges, inclusivity

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Antiracism and Universal Design for Learning by Andratesha Fritzgerald

Facilitators as Co-Learners: Adrienne Wright, Design | Marty Ludlum, Finance
2-3 p.m. | Feb. 12, 19, 26, March 5, via Zoom

Pedagogy: course design, neurodiversity, inclusivity

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Chasing The Perfect: Thoughts On Modernist Design In Our Time by Natalia Ilyin

Facilitator as Co-Learner: Monique Ortman, Design
3-4 p.m. | Feb. 26, March 5, 15, 19 and 26, via Zoom

Pedagogy: whole self, communication, design


WORKSHOPS

Evaluating Course Alignment Through a Syllabus:  Does your Course Make Sense?

Facilitator with Knowledge: Jody Horn (CETTL)
3:30-4:45 p.m. | Jan. 25, via Zoom

Pedagogy: authentic assessment, decision-making, critical reflection

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Service Learning Scholars: Plan and Implement Service Learning Projects into Your Course

Facilitators with Knowledge: Christy Vincent, Mass Communication | Nicole Doherty, Enrollment and Student Success
12:30-1:30 p.m. | Feb. 8, 22, March 8, via Zoom

Pedagogy: authentic assessment, decision-making, critical reflection

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Successfully Supporting BGLTQ+ Students: An Interactive Student Panel

Facilitator with Knowledge: Lindsey Churchill, History and Geography | Facilitators as Co-Learners: Suzanne Clinton and Abbie Lambert, Management
noon-1:30 p.m. | Feb. 10, via Zoom

Pedagogy: authentic assessment, decision-making, critical reflection

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Online Teaching Strategies, Best Practices, Challenges and Success Stories

Facilitators as Co-Learners: Suzanne Clinton and Abbie Lambert, Melody Edwards, Management | Kelly Ross, CeCE
11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. | Feb. 17, via Zoom

Pedagogy: online strategies, decision-making, critical reflection

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Creating and Managing TL Environments

Facilitators with Knowledge: Brenton Wimmer, STLR | Trevor Cox, AESS
2-4 p.m. | April 14, via Zoom

Pedagogy: course design, learning environments, transformative learning


STLR Training Sessions

Facilitators with Knowledge: Brenton Wimmer, Camille Farrell, Mark Walvoord, STLR

Pedagogy: transformative learning, transformative learning assessments, student engagement

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Additional STLR Opportunities

Facilitators with Knowledge: Brenton Wimmer, Camille Farrell, Mark Walvoord, STLR

Pedagogy: transformative learning, transformative learning assessments, critical reflection

Household Higher Ed Cancellation Plans Fall 2020 Semester

Chart showing break-out of households with one or more residents cancelling plans to attend fall semester 2020, with break-out categories by race, level of education (high school, some college, bachelor's degree), income level, and whether the household had one or more residents using SNAP (food stamps), who are unemployed, or who are depending on only regular income to the household.

Chart showing break-out of households with one or more residents cancelling plans to attend fall semester 2020, with break-out categories by race, level of education (high school, some college, bachelor’s degree), income level, and whether the household had one or more residents using SNAP (food stamps), who are unemployed, or who are depending on only regular income to the household.

Principles of Learning from New Faculty Orientation 2020

The following was presented at the virtual New Faculty Orientation at UCO for the Fall 2020 semester, by Dr. Jody Horn — 

Brain-Based Principles of Learning:

  1. Malleable; Changed by Experience
  2. Connects New Information to Old
  3. Unique and Uniquely Organized
  4. Not Equal, because context and ability influence learning

Other important concepts to consider for effective teaching:

  • Active Retrieval: More mental effort, but long-term memory increases when repeatedly retrieving information
  • Aligning/Authentic Assessment: What students are assessed over should be what they are learning which should match the learning activities
  • Clear Learning Goals: Students who know where they are “going” in class are more likely to be successful
  • Encoding: Learners must encode information into their longer-term memory
  • Feedback: Students must receive timely feedback on their performance to help them encode and learn
  • Metacognition: Students learn through reflecting, and they learn how to learn by reflecting on how they learn! This will lead to them becoming lifelong learners.

The fact that learning is malleable is significant because that means it can be impacted by students’ practice. To take advantage of this feature of learning, faculty should have a growth mindset and use certain classroom activity practices: scaffolding, active learning, and peer-to-peer instruction.  Also, to help mold student learning, they should consider using rubrics for just-in-time feedback.

Constructivism is a theoretical underpinning of student learning that says we create our own knowledge based on individual sets of experiences. What can faculty do to help or hinder student learning under this philosophy?

Help them discover prior knowledge and connect it to new knowledge:

Beginning of Course: First day final exam, Background knowledge probe (short answer format, response to a case), Concept test

Throughout Course: Entry/Exit Tickets, Quick write, Muddiest point, Minute paper, Describe personal relevance

End of Course: Final papers, projects, and presentations; Tests; ePortfolios

Not discovery-oriented, hinders learning: Bottlenecks in learning (stuck at a concept and can’t learn more), Knowledge built on false conceptions, Memorization

Picture of synapse of 2 neurons with with words Encoding - Storage - Retrieval and "Repeated Retrieval, up arrow, Deeper learning"Repeated Retrieval of information —-> Deeper Learning
Repeat their neural processes of Encoding —> Storage —-> Retrieval

To help them store and retrieve, consider helping them organize information and concepts. Organized knowledge can help them better retrain, transfer, think critically about, and integrate the ideas from the information. Disorganized knowledge is more superficial, sparsely connected to other concepts, and/or incorrectly connected to other concepts.  Help students organize information by:

  • Providing students the organizational structure of the course
  • Explicitly making the connections among concepts or categories covered in class (show cause and effect processes, assign concept mapping to reveal correct and incorrect connections)
  • Monitor student work regularly for problems in their knowledge organization (could use quick writes, summary statements,  or muddiest points activities)

But what if they don’t care about learning the information? Consider the research on student motivation. Student motivation is tied to:

  • Autonomy: Do they feel in control of their own learning? To whom do they attribute their success in learning? Strategies that help with this are exam wrappers, critical reflection, learning surveys, study outlines, taking notes, student-generated rubrics, giving students choice on projects/papers
  • Competence: Do students feel they can accomplish the task ahead? Strategies to help students here include: giving explanations about cognition and how the brain works (plasticity, growth mindset); giving examples of completed assignments; testimonials from past students; allowing student-created syllabi
  • Sense of belonging and relatedness: Students in a class hold each other responsible for each others learning. Strategies to assist include: First day reflections (what/why do they want to get out of this class); first day ice breakers; group learning and problem-based learning; think-pair-share activities
  • Self Esteem: Students feel that they can “do it.” Strategies that help include: Past student testimonials; growth mindset; student reflection on past successes in high school or other classes

A Proposed Revision of the UCO Classroom Evaluation Process for Tenured and Nontenured Faculty

by John R. Wood, Associate professor, UCO¹

In this white paper, I would like to make a case for the University of Central Oklahoma to revise their classroom evaluation process for tenure and nontenure faculty. We need to address the need to change the classroom evaluation requirements for UCO tenure track and non-tenure-track faculty because summative evaluations of faculty create unneeded stress for faculty and students. Regrettably, many, if not most, UCO faculty are required to conduct summative classroom evaluations in every class, every year.

Simply, for a summative evaluation, the quantitative measure’s value is limited to “information needed to make a personnel decision – for example, hiring, promotion, tenure, merit pay” (Chism, 2007,  5). Theoretically, the correlation between higher grades and higher evaluations would indicate more learning; however, this is not necessarily the case (See Marsh and Roche 1997, 2000). Unfortunately, “an evaluation often tells more about a student’s opinion of a professor than about the professor’s teaching effectiveness” (Williams, 2007, 171). Student evaluations also tend to be more positive toward instructors who display a certain level of warmth in their behavior (Best & Addison, 2000). Moreover, faculty perceived as caring receive higher numerical outcomes on evaluations, and this also affects student perceptions of their own cognitive learning, signifying that an instructor’s personal characteristics can influence evaluations (Teven & McCroskey, 1997).

Education scholars also find that internal factors, i.e., professor’s sexual orientation, ethnicity, gender, or in the course content, or the nature of the course itself, the rigor of the course and the faculty member’s teaching style, less demanding courses, influence numerical outcomes in these types of numerical evaluations. Internal factors consider such aspects, as the professor’s sexual orientation, ethnicity, gender, or in the course content, or the nature of the course itself, can influence the numerical outcomes of the evaluation (Basow & Howe, 1987; Hobson, 1997; Sidanius & Crane, 1989; Williams, 2007; Flaherty, 2018). According to Centra (2003, 498), there is a bias “when a student, teacher, or course characteristic affects the evaluations made, either positively or negatively, but is unrelated to any criteria of good teaching, such as increased student learning.” For example, prior work has found that student evaluations are related to grading leniency (Greenwald & Gilmore, 1997) and the gender of the instructor (Basow & Silberg, 1987). Other factors can also influence these numerical outcomes, such as the rigor of the course and the faculty member’s teaching style. Likewise, the personal appearance of the instructor, including student perceptions of gender or race of the instructor, can influence these evaluations. Findings in the broader literature support claims both for and against the notion that the appearance of the instructor influences student scores of instructor effectiveness (Campbell, Gerdes, & Steiner, 2005). There is also research suggesting that instructors who teach fewer demanding courses receive evaluations that are abnormally high (Overbaugh, 1998). In addition, not surprisingly, a student’s class grade & Gillmore, 1997; Tang, 1999).

In fact, the evidence opposing the validity of these evaluations is compelling.

Two types of evaluation of teaching – summative and formative.

1.    Indirect assessment (summative) of teaching captures students’ perceptions of their learning (UCO’s SPIES). It is a proxy for student learning

2.    Direct assessments (formative) of student learning reflect a demonstration/evidence of student learning (Maki, 2010). Indirect measures are tests of validity in the sense that there is a discrepancy between the judgmental measure (usually a rating of achievement) and the criterion measure (a score on a standardized achievement test). Direct measures are a more direct test of validity in that teachers are directly asked to estimate the achievement test performance of their students. On the whole, the results revealed high levels of validity for the teacher-judgment measures. Best practices cited in Maki (2010) are teaching portfolios (including a teaching philosophy and evidence of practice (samples direct assessment).

While summative classroom evaluation is helpful to assess faculty, it does little in terms of learning and reflecting on improving teaching (Chism, 2007). However, a formative evaluation “describes activities that provide teachers with information that they can use to improve their teaching” (Chism, 2007, p. 5). In balance, Lewis and Benson (1998; Youmans & Lee, 2007) find that summative faculty evaluations persist to provide balance to the hotly debated question whether student evaluations are either valid or reliable indicators of either the faculty’s effectiveness or the course’s quality. However, as long as universities continue to regard student input as important, instruments measuring student perception, inadequate they may be, will presumably remain part of the process. Even so, they should not be the primary and only process of class evaluation, which then presents a circular argument to support a second imperfect evaluative process, i.e., peer evaluation among faculty. Revising the nature of faculty peer evaluations would retain the feedback benefits to the observed while potentially also generating more instructional dialogue among faculty (Chism, 2007). Similarly, the American Association of University Professors’ (AAUP), argue that any system developed for evaluation are best directed toward constructive measures for improvement (Euben, 2005).

 

Thus, the following suggestions for revision should be considered:

Tenure track and nontenure track faculty should be assessed with a summative classroom evaluation only in the 1st, 3rd, 5th, and every third year for post tenure review and for promotion to full professor. Summative evaluation focuses on information “needed to make a personnel decision – for example, hiring, promotion, tenure, merit pay” (Chism, 2007, 5).

a. Often quantitative

b. For public inspection

c. Determine quality of teaching performance compared to peers

d. Conducted at given intervals, i. e., Annual or promotion and tenure reviews

 

Faculty should supplement summative classroom evaluation with a formative classroom evaluation with combination of peer review and a teaching portfolio. Formative evaluation provides teachers with information they can use to improve their teaching (Chism, 2007, 5).

a. For personal use, private and confidential.

b. Qualitative

c. Peer reviews & Portfolios

d. Focused on continuous learning & improvement

During the 2nd, 4th, and every year summative classroom evaluations are not required. The faculty member would create a teaching portfolio that will create a conversation with their respective department chair and dean on how to promote continuous improvement.

The faculty member can use peer evaluation, their own questionnaire, etc. The teaching portfolio will not be a part of an official document unless the faculty member so desires.

In this way, a combination of a summative evaluation will make administrators happy with accountability in mind and easy numerical measures to manage a large number of faculty.  In balance, a formative evaluation is best when the faculty continuously learn about their students and facilitate innovation in the classroom.

References:

Basow, Susan. A., and Karen. G. Howe. 1987. “Evaluations of college professors: Effects of professors’ sex-type, and sex, and students’ sex.” Psychological Reports 60:671-8.

Campbell, Heather, Karen Gerdes, and Sue Steiner. 2005. “What’s Looks Got to Do with It? Instructor Appearance and Student Evaluations of Teaching.” Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, 24 (3): 611-620.

Centra, John A. 2003 “Will Teachers Receive Higher Student Evaluations by Giving Higher grades and Less Course Work?” Research in Higher Education 44(5) Oct. 03: 495-518.

Chism, Nancy Van Note. 2007. Peer Reviewing of Teaching: A Sourcebook. 2nd Ed. Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis: Anker Publishing.

Euben, Donna. 2005. “Post-Tenure Review: Some Case Law” AAUP Counsel https://www.aaup.org/issues/tenure/some-case-law (accessed May 30, 2020).

Flaherty, C. 2018. “Same Course, Different Ratings Study says students rate male instructors more highly than women even when they’re teaching identical courses. Inside Higher Ed. https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2018/03/14/study-says-students-rate-men-more-highly-women-even-when-theyre-teaching-identical

Greenwald, Anthony. G., & Gilmore, Gerald. M. 1997. “Grading leniency is a removable contaminant of student ratings.” American Psychologist 52, 1209-1217. http://faculty.washington.edu/agg/pdf/Gwald_Gillmore_AmPsychologist_1997.OCR.pdf (accessed December 20, 2019).

Hobson, Suzanne. M. 1997. “The impact of sex and gender-role orientation on student evaluations of teaching effectiveness in counselor education and counseling psychology.” Ed.D. diss. Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo.

Lewis, Jerry M. and Denzel E. Benson. 1998. “Section Eight. Course Evaluations,”: 99- 114 in Tips for Teaching Introductory Sociology, edited by Jerry M. Lewis. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth

Maki, Peggy. 2010.  Assessing for learning: building a sustainable commitment across the institution. 2nd edition. Sterling, VA: Stylus Publishing.

Marsh, Herbert. W., and Lawrence. A. Roche. 2000. “Effects of grading leniency and low workload on students’ evaluations of teaching: Popular myth, bias, validity, or innocent bystanders?” Journal of Education Psychology 92: 202-28.

Overbaugh, Richard. C. 1998. “The effect of course rigor on preservice teachers’ course and instructor evaluation.” Computers in the Schools 14:13-23.

Sidanius, Jim, and Marie. Crane. 1989. “Job evaluation and gender: The case of university faculty.” Journal of Applied Social Psychology 19:174-97.

Stumpf, Steven. A., and Richard. D. Freedman. 1979. “Expected grade covariation with student ratings of instruction: Individual versus class effects.” Journal of Educational Psychology 71:293-302.

Tang, Shengming. 1999. “Student evaluation of teachers: Effects of grading at college level.” Journal of Research and Development in Education 32:83-8.

Teven, Jason. J., and James. C. McCroskey. 1997. “The relationship of perceived teacher caring with student learning and teacher evaluation.” Communication Education 46:1-9.

Williams, Dana A. 2007. “Examining the Relation between Race and Student Evaluations of Faculty Members: A Literature Review.” Profession: 168-173.

Youmans, Robert J. and Benjamin D. Lee. 2007. “Fudging the Numbers: Distributing Chocolate Influences Student Evaluations of an Undergraduate Course.” Teaching of Psychology 34 (4): 245-247.

 

¹ This white paper was created after an UCO CETTL workshop on the book by Chism, Nancy Van Note. 2007. Peer Reviewing of Teaching: A Sourcebook in the fall 2018.

My Transformative Experience While Teaching

[Written by Therese Williams, PhD]

As a mature white woman newly teaching at the university level, I have been afforded opportunities that were not frequently offered while I spent many years working in industry and government.  I have participated in numerous book groups sponsored by the 21st Century Pedagogy Institute (21CPI) at UCO and learned from each experience.

In the fall of 2019, I participated with a group reading and discussing “ain’t i a woman” by bell hooks. Although I was aware of some of the horrors women in slavery experienced in this country, and I knew that racial discrimination has continued long after the Emancipation Proclamation,  the 13th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution and the Civil Rights Act of 1964 were enacted; I was not aware that white women actively discriminated against women of color during the Women’s Suffrage Movement in the late 1800s and early 1900s.  During this group, the book “White Fragility: Why It’s So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism” by Robin DiAngelo was recommended to me.  It went on my list, but as it happens, it became a group in the spring of 2020.

This book significantly helped me to understand things that I ‘thought’ I knew and things that I probably didn’t know and I finally understand the ‘white privilege’ mentality that is so pervasive in our society, in all of our lives, and especially in corporate and government power structures.  As part of this book group, for 21CPI, I wrote a reflection that committed to continuing my education on these topics and to support, in ways that are possible for me, the goals of groups that are struggling to change our society to become more inclusive and provide a level playing field for ALL people.

And then George Floyd was murdered.  I have attended a webinar supported by white women in the Women’s March movement who want to help others become educated on the issues, a webinar sponsored by Black Lives Matter OKC that featured Black Women who spoke about their struggles and changes they believe will be effective, a webinar sponsored by UCO – “Navigating Racial Trauma Panel” which spoke to helping yourself and others to handle racial trauma, and bits and pieces of other opportunities including reading a newly recommended book “How to be an Anti-Racist” by Ibram X. Kendi.  I’ve learned that it’s not enough to just not be a racist but that one must actively be an anti-racist.  One of the many quotes attributed to Martin Luther King is “There comes a time when silence is betrayal,” and I am taking this quote to heart.

I teach primarily technology classes in the College of Business.  As such, there is not much opportunity to slide social issues into the classroom.  As a result of some of the transformation I have been going through, I am working on a personal inclusion statement to be included in my classes.  At first, I thought I would include it in the syllabus, but as all instructors know, only a few students really read the syllabus!  Therefore, I am going to include it as a separate document.  I will discuss my journey, the organizations I am supporting, and include a recommended reading list culled from books recommended to me and other lists I have seen.

When I was an undergraduate student, although I read a great deal, I was not exposed to ideas on social issues other than in my family.  And in my family, we did not (and still don’t) discuss issues beyond the basics of kindness, fairness, and truth.  My hope is that, perhaps, someone in a class will start to think about these issues beyond what they have already learned, and it will become transformational for them.

Addressing Racial and Social Injustice

Graphic logo for University of Central Oklahoma's Center for Excellence in Transformative Teaching and Learning

The Center for Excellence in Transformative Teaching and Learning (CETTL) includes the 21st Century Pedagogy Institute (21CPI), Student Transformative Learning Record (STLR), and Educators’ Leadership Academy (ELA). Collectively, we serve faculty and students at UCO and beyond.

In times that underscore the ongoing need to not just denounce racism but to be anti-racist, CETTL, 21CPI, STLR, and ELA commit to more than simply continuing what we do now, such as our ongoing work over the years like past development opportunities around race and sexual identities, and faculty-led book groups on titles like White Fragility and Teaching Queer, and our STLR work with Global & Cultural Competencies. (Please visit Selected Professional Development Resources about Social Injustice for Faculty and Staff.) We further commit to accepting the challenge that we, UCO, and the nation must meet to bring justice and equity to our campus and our society for all Black people and People of Color as well as other marginalized and disenfranchised groups and individuals among our fellow colleagues and citizens.

Perhaps no other college or university is more strongly called to meet this challenge. Because UCO centers itself around Transformative Learning (TL), we must in these times follow its process, one that literally defines personal learning and growth as prompted by disorienting dilemmas that lead to critical self-reflection followed by perspective shifts that help learners change themselves and their conceptions to embrace new and better ways of being.

We’re a university. Learning is what we do. Past learning and growth to become less racist is part of who we are, but now we are challenged to learn more, to do more.

Protests across the nation are calling attention to what for many in the privileged class may be the disorienting dilemma that is our country’s current and long-standing failure to ensure equity in treatment for Black people and People of Color, LGBTQIA+, and other groups suffering unequal treatment. Among our fellow citizens and colleagues who suffer the inequitable treatment dilemma daily, there is always the dilemma of how to make a co-worker or a group or a nation listen, to understand, to change.

We commit to listen. We will work to understand, and we will change as a result of our critical reflection and with the help and guidance of colleagues. To that end, CETTL, 21CPI, STLR, ELA are initiating among ourselves TL-focused processes with the intent to improve ourselves to become better colleagues and models for others. We hope our journey will produce transformative realizations in service to adding to the broader solution so necessary right now.

This is in addition to the work we do daily to support diversity and inclusivity and in providing resources and learning opportunities to support the transformative realizations and the resulting behavior and mindset changes that others may seek.

Jeff King, Ed.D., Executive Director, Center for Excellence in Transformative Teaching and Learning (CETTL)
Jody Horn, Ph.D., Director, 21st Century Pedagogy Institute (21 CPI)
Cary Williams, Director, Educators’ Leadership Academy (ELA)
Camille Farrell, M.Ed., Assistant Director, Student Transformative Learning Record (STLR)
Mark Walvoord, M.S., Assistant Director, Student Transformative Learning Record (STLR)
Brenton Wimmer, Ph.D., Assistant Director, Transformative Learning (TL) Assessment
Jon Hicks, Administrative Assistant III, CETTL


Horizontal logo graphic of Student Transformative Learning RecordLogo graphic of 21st Century Pedagogy Institute  Logo graphic of Educators' Leadership Academy

100 N. University Dr., Box 212, CTL 200 • Edmond, OK 73034 • Phone (405) 974-5570 • cettl.uco.edu21CPI.uco.edustlr.uco.eduela.uco.edutlconference.uco.edu

Selected Professional Development Resources about Social Injustice for Faculty and Staff

Addressing Racial and Social Injustice

In times that underscore the ongoing need to not just denounce racism but to be anti-racist, CETTL, 21CPI, STLR, and ELA commit to more than simply continuing what we do now…We further commit to accepting the challenge that we, UCO, and the nation must meet to bring justice and equity to our campus and our society for all Black people and People of Color as well as other marginalized and disenfranchised groups and individuals among our fellow colleagues and citizens… Read Full Letter


Upcoming Professional Development Book Groups on Topics of Racial & Social Injustice

 

Front cover of the book How to Be an Antiracist, by Ibram X. FendiHow to Be an Antiracist, by Ibram X. Kendi

  • Open to UCO faculty and staff
  • E-books will be provided to registrants in the order in which participants register, until our stock of books is depleted. If you want to join and the e-books are gone, please feel free to purchase your own copy and join the group.
  • Attendance at two out of three sessions and the creation of critical reflection is required for receiving a book.
Time, Dates, Location:
2:30-3:45 p.m. | July 14, July 21, July 28 | Zoom Meeting
FacilitatorMichelle Johnson, Adult Education and Safety Sciences

Front cover of the book Deconstructing Privilege: Teaching and Learning as Allies in the Classroom, by Kim Case

Deconstructing Privilege: Teaching and Learning as Allies in the Classroom, by Kim Case

  • Open to all full time and adjunct faculty
  • E-books and hardcover books will be provided to registrants in the order in which participants register, until our stock of books is depleted. If you want to join and the e-books are gone, please feel free to purchase your copy and join the group.
  • Attendance at two out of three sessions and the creation of critical reflection is required for receiving a book.
Time, Dates, Location:
1:30-3:00 p.m. | June 30, July 14, July 28 | Zoom Meeting
FacilitatorsMatt Hollrah and David Macey, English

Register here for Deconstructing Privilege book group


Selected Additional Resources

Inclusive Reading List in Political Science (with thanks to Victor Asal, Journal of Political Science Education Editor in Chief and the JPSE editorial team for the help organizing this list)

Documentaries to Watch

  • 13th, Netflix
  • When They See Us, Netflix
  • I Am Not Your Negro, Netflix, Amazon Prime
  • The Kalief Browder Story, Netflix
  • Stay Woke: The Black Lives Matter Movement, Amazon Prime or YouTube
  • Freedom Riders, Amazon Prime

Movies to Watch

  • Just Mercy, presently made free by the production company to educate, on YouTube, Amazon, Apple TV, Google Play
  • American Son, Netflix
  • Do the Right Thing, Amazon Prime
  • If Beale Street Could Talk, Hulu
  • Fruitvale Station, Hulu
  • Selma, available to rent
  • Wyatt Cenac’s Problem Areas, HBO
  • BlacKkKlansman, HBO Max

TV Shows to Watch

  • Dear White People, Netflix
  • Watchmen, Amazon Prime
  • Atlanta, Hulu
  • Self Made: Inspired by the Life of Madam C.J. Walker, Netflix
  • Luke Cage, Netflix


Anti-Racist Pedagogy Reading List (In part compiled by Andrea Aebersold, Ph. D – University of California, Irvine)

  • Akamine Phillips, Jennifer; Risdon, Nate; Lamsma, Matthew; Hambrick, Angelica; & Jun, Alexander (2019). Barriers and strategies by white faculty who incorporate antiracist pedagogy. Race and Pedagogy Journal: Teaching and Learning for Justice, 3(2).
  • Alexander, M. (2020 – updated edition) The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness. New York: The New Press
  • Ash, A. N.; Hill, R.; Risdon, S. & Jun, A. (2020) Anti-racism in higher education: A model for change. Race and Pedagogy Journal: Teaching and Learning for Justice, 4(3).
  • Baldwin, J. (1963, December 21) “A Talk to Teachers.” The Saturday Review, 42-44.
  • Blackwell, D.M. (2010) Sidelines and separate spaces: Making education antiracist for students of color. Race, Ethnicity and Education, 13(4) pp. 473–494.
  • Blakeney, A. M. (2005) Antiracist Pedagogy: Definition, Theory, and Professional Development. Journal of Curriculum and Pedagogy, 2 (1) pp. 119–132
  • Case, K.A. (2013). Deconstructing privilege: Teaching and learning as allies in the classroom. New York: Routledge
  • Case, K. A. (Ed.) (2017). Intersectional pedagogy: Complicating identity and social justice. New York: Routledge/Taylor & Francis Group
  • Cole, C.E. (2017) Culturally sustaining pedagogy in higher education: Teaching so that black lives matter. Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, 36(8) pp. 736–750.
  • Condon, F. & Young, V.A. (eds) (2017). Performing antiracist pedagogy in rhetoric, writing, and communication. Fort Collins: The WAC Clearinghouse
  • D’Angelo, R. (2018). White fragility: Why it’s so hard for white people to talk about racism. Boston: Beacon Press.
  • Douglass Horsford, S., Grosland, T. J., & Morgan Gunn, K. (2011). Pedagogy of the personal and professional: Considering culturally relevant and antiracist pedagogy as a framework for culturally relevant leadership. Journal of School Leadership, 21(4).
  • Freire, P. (2000). Pedagogy of the oppressed. New York: Continuum
  • Giroux, Henry A. (2003). Spectacles of race and pedagogies of denial: Anti-black racist pedagogy under the reign of neoliberalism. Communication Education, 52(191-4), pp.191-211.
  • Haynes, C. (2017). Dismantling the white supremacy embedded in our classrooms: White faculty in pursuit of more equitable educational outcomes. International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education, 29(1), 87-107
  • Haynes, C., & Patton, L. D. (2019). From racial resistance to racial consciousness: Engaging white stem faculty in pedagogical transformation. Journal of Cases in Educational Leadership, 22(2), 85–98. https://doi.org/10.1177/1555458919829845
  • hooks, b. (1994) Teaching to transgress: Education as the practice of freedom. New York: Routledge.
  • Howell, A. & Tuitt, F. (2003) Race and higher education: rethinking pedagogy in diverse college classrooms. Cambridge: Harvard Educational Review
  • Inoue, A. B. (2015). Antiracist writing assessment ecologies: Teaching and assessing writing for a socially just future. Fort Collins: Parlor Press/WAC Clearinghouse
  • Inoue, A. B. (2019). Ccccc chair’s address: how do we language so people stop killing each other, or what do we do about white language supremacy. CCC 71.2
  • Jenkins, C. (2016). Addressing white privilege in higher education. Academic Exchange Quarterly, 20(4), 121-126. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/158792
  • Jenkins, C. M. (2018). Educators, question your level of cultural responsiveness. Journal on Empowering Teaching Excellence, 2(2), 15-23. https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/jete/vol2/iss2/4
  • Jenkins, C. (2018). Intersectional considerations in teaching diversity. In Carter, N & Vavrus, M. (Eds.), Intersectionalities of Race, Class, and Gender with Teaching and Teacher Education: Movement Toward Equity in Education. Leiden. The Netherlands: Brill/Sense. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1163/9789004365209_003
  • Jenkins, C., & Alfred, M. (2018). Understanding the motivation and transformation of White culturally responsive professors. Journal of Adult and Continuing Education, 24(1), 81-99. https://doi.org/10.1177/1477971417738793
  • Joseph, N. M., Haynes, C., Cobb, F. (Eds.). (2016). Interrogating whiteness and relinquishing power: White faculty’s commitment to racial consciousness STEM classrooms New York: Peter Lang Publishing.
  • Kailin, J. (2002). Antiracist education: From theory to practice. New York: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc
  • Kandaswamy, P. (2007). Beyond colorblindness and multiculturalism: Rethinking antiracist pedagogy in the university classroom. Radical Teacher, 80(6)
  • Kendi, I.X. (2019). How to Be an Antiracist. New York: One World
  • Kendi, I.X. (2017). Stamped from the beginning: The definitive history of racist ideas in America. New York: Bold Type Books
  • Kishimoto, K. (2018) Antiracist pedagogy: from faculty’s self-reflection to organizing within and beyond the classroom. Race Ethnicity and Education, 2(4), pp.540-554, DOI: 10.1080/13613324.2016.1248824
  • Lawrence, S. M. & Tatum, B. (1997). Teachers in transition: The impact of antiracist professional development on classroom practice. Teachers College Record, 99, 162–180
  • Milagros Castillo-Montoya, Joshua Abreu & Abdul Abad (2019) Racially liberatory pedagogy: A Black Lives Matter approach to education. International Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education, 32(9), pp., 1125-1145, DOI: 10.1080/09518398.2019.1645904
  • Oluo, I. (2019). So you want to talk about race? New York: Seal Press.
  • Phillips, C.B. & Derman-Sparks, L. (1997). Teaching/learning anti-racism: A developmental approach. New York: Teachers College Press.
  • Picower, B. (2009) The unexamined Whiteness of teaching: How White teachers maintain and enact dominant racial ideologies, Race Ethnicity and Education, 12:2, 197-215, DOI: 10.1080/13613320902995475
  • Pierce, Andrew J. J. (2016). Interest Convergence: An alternative to white privilege models of antiracist pedagogy and practice. Teaching Philosophy, 39(4), pp. 507–530
  • Saad, L.F. (2020). Me and white supremacy: Combat racism, change the world, and become a good ancestor. Naperville: Sourcebooks
  • Schick, C. (2000) ‘By Virtue of Being White’: Resistance in Anti-Racist Pedagogy. Race Ethnicity and Education, 3(1) pp. 83–101.
  • Sue, D. W. (2015) Race talk and the conspiracy of silence: Understanding and facilitating difficult dialogues on race. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley
  • Tatum, B.D. (2017). Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria? And Other Conversations About Race. New York: Basic Books.
  • Torino, G. C. (2015) Examining biases and white privilege: Classroom teaching strategies that promote cultural competence. Women & Therapy, 38(3-4) pp. 295–307
  • Tuitt, F. (2003b). Afterword: Realizing a more inclusive pedagogy. In A. Howell, & F. Tuitt (Eds.), Race and higher education: Rethinking pedagogy in diverse college classrooms (pp. 243–268). Cambridge, MA: Harvard Educational Review.
  • Tuitt, F., Haynes, C. & Stewart, S. (Eds.), (2016). Race, equity, and the learning environment: The global relevance of critical and inclusive pedagogies in higher education. Sterling, VA: Stylus
  • Tuitt, F., Haynes, C. & Stewart, S. (2018), Transforming the Classroom at Traditionally White Institutions to Make Black Lives Matter. To Improve the Academy, 37, pp. 63-76. doi:10.1002/tia2.20071
  • Wagner, A. (2005). Unsettling the academy: Working through the challenges of antiracist pedagogy. Race Ethnicity and Education, 8(3), 261-275.

Past/Current/Future CETTL-21CPI-STLR-ELA Activities

Still to Come Book Groups

  • Oklahomo: Lessons in Unqueering America by C. Mason, several facilitators and groups, Jessica Appleby (Modern Languages) and others. This book is a collaboration with the Gender and Sexualities Conference sponsored by the BGLTQ+ Student Center;
  • Against Common Sense:  Teaching and Learning Toward Social Justice, by K. K. Kumashiro, facilitator J. David Macey (English)

Related Past Book Groups and Workshops

  • White Fragility by Robin DiAngelo
  • ain’t i a woman: black women and feminism by bell hooks
  • Antiracist Writing Assessment Ecologies: Teaching and Assessing Writing for a Socially Just Future by Asao B. Inoue
  • Teaching Queer: Radical Possibilities for Writing and Knowing by Stacey Waite
  • Bandwidth Recovery: Helping Students Reclaim Resources Lost to Poverty, Racism, and Social Marginalization by Cia Verschelden (author is formerly of UCO)
  • Generative Knowledge Institute and Embodied Reflection by Melissa Peet
  • Intercultural Development Inventory by IDI, LLC in Collaboration with the Center for Global Competency
  • Beyond the Asterisk: Understanding Native Students in Higher Education, edited by Heather Shotton et al.
  • Allyship to Advocacy: Sexuality, Gender, and Transformative Learning in Collaboration with the Office of Cultural Competency
  • Teaching the Whole Student: Engaged Learning With Heart, Mind, and Spirit by David Schoem
  • Grit: The Power of Passion and Perseverance by Angela Duckworth
  • Daring Greatly: How the Courage to Be Vulnerable Transforms the Way We Live, Love, Parent, and Lead by Brené Brown
  • Trans* on Campus: Opportunities for Inclusion in Collaboration with SAFE and the Office of Cultural Competency
  • Cultural Competence in the Classroom Series in Collaboration with the Office of Diversity and Inclusion, SAFE, and the Center for Global Competency
  • Connecting Students with Global Opportunities

Past and Ongoing Global Cultural Competencies Campus Support

  • Iraqi Scholar Visitors (each year 5-6 visiting faculty since 2014)
  • Transformative Learning Scholar Post-Doctoral Faculty Research from Universidade Presbiteriana Mackenzie, São Paulo, Brazil
  • Student Transformative Learning Record (STLR) Faculty Staff Training on How to Incorporate and Assess the Central 6 Tenets (including Global and Cultural Competencies; STLR staff have facilitated training for 775+ faculty and staff in completing a 6-hour workshop and additional sessions)
  • STLR Financial and Overall Support to Black Male Initiative & Black Male Summit, Hispanic Success Initiative & Primeros Pasos, Native American Success Initiative, and LGBTQ+ Success Initiative (in Collaboration with the Office of Diversity and Inclusion and BGLTQ+ Student Center)
  • STLR-tagged Credit and Campus-Wide Partnerships for Global and Cultural Competencies Assignments, Events, Student Groups, Projects, and Campus Locations
  • International Transformative Learning Collaborative Working Partnerships with:
        • Universidade Presbiteriana Mackenzie | Sao Paulo, Brazil
        • University of the Free State | Bloemfontein, South Africa
        • Durban University of Technology | Durban, South Africa
        • University Of Eldoret | Eldoret, Kenya
        • Koya University | Koy Sanjaq, Iraq
        • Kathmandu University | Dhulikhel, Nepal
        • Methodist College Kuala Lumpur | Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
        • Singapore Management University | Singapore
        • Murdoch University | Murdoch, Australia
        • Massey University | Manawatu,  New Zealand with Māori Cultural Education
        • Technological University of Dublin | Dublin, Ireland
        • Collège La Cité | Ottawa, Canada

Anti-racist Pedagogy Reading List 2020

In part compiled by Andrea Aebersold, Ph. D – University of California, Irvine — 

Akamine Phillips, Jennifer; Risdon, Nate; Lamsma, Matthew; Hambrick, Angelica; & Jun, Alexander (2019). Barriers and strategies by white faculty who incorporate antiracist pedagogy. Race and Pedagogy Journal: Teaching and Learning for Justice, 3(2).

Alexander, M. (2020 – updated edition) The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness. New York: The New Press

Ash, A. N.; Hill, R.; Risdon, S. & Jun, A. (2020) Anti-racism in higher education: A model for change. Race and Pedagogy Journal: Teaching and Learning for Justice, 4(3).

Baldwin, J. (1963, December 21) “A Talk to Teachers.” The Saturday Review, 42-44.

Blackwell, D.M. (2010) Sidelines and separate spaces: Making education antiracist for students  of color. Race, Ethnicity and Education, 13(4) pp. 473–494.

Blakeney, A. M. (2005) Antiracist Pedagogy: Definition, Theory, and Professional Development. Journal of Curriculum and Pedagogy, 2 (1) pp. 119–132

Case, K.A. (2013). Deconstructing privilege: Teaching and learning as allies in the classroom. New York: Routledge

Case, K. A. (Ed.) (2017). Intersectional pedagogy: Complicating identity and social justice. New York: Routledge/Taylor & Francis Group

Cole, C.E. (2017) Culturally sustaining pedagogy in higher education: Teaching so that black lives matter. Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, 36(8) pp. 736–750.

Condon, F. & Young, V.A. (eds) (2017). Performing antiracist pedagogy in rhetoric, writing, and communication. Fort Collins: The WAC Clearinghouse

D’Angelo, R. (2018). White fragility: Why it’s so hard for white people to talk about racism. Boston: Beacon Press.

Douglass Horsford, S., Grosland, T. J., & Morgan Gunn, K. (2011). Pedagogy of the personal and professional: Considering culturally relevant and antiracist pedagogy as a framework for culturally relevant leadership. Journal of School Leadership, 21(4).

Freire, P. (2000). Pedagogy of the oppressed. New York: Continuum

Giroux, Henry A. (2003). Spectacles of race and pedagogies of denial: Anti-black racist pedagogy under the reign of neoliberalism. Communication Education, 52(191-4), pp.191-211.

Haynes, C. (2017). Dismantling the white supremacy embedded in our classrooms: White  faculty in pursuit of more equitable educational outcomes. International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education, 29(1), 87-107

Haynes, C., & Patton, L. D. (2019). From racial resistance to racial consciousness: Engaging white stem faculty in pedagogical transformation. Journal of Cases in Educational Leadership, 22(2), 85–98. https://doi.org/10.1177/1555458919829845

Hooks, b. (1994) Teaching to transgress: Education as the practice of freedom. New York: Routledge.

Howell, A. & Tuitt, F. (2003) Race and higher education: rethinking pedagogy in diverse college classrooms. Cambridge: Harvard Educational Review

Inoue, A. B. (2015). Antiracist writing assessment ecologies: Teaching and assessing writing for a socially just future. Fort Collins: Parlor Press/WAC Clearinghouse

Inoue, A. B. (2019). Ccccc chair’s address: how do we language so people stop killing each other, or what do we do about white language supremacy. CCC 71.2

Jenkins, C. (2016). Addressing white privilege in higher education. Academic Exchange Quarterly, 20(4), 121-126. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/158792

Jenkins, C. M. (2018). Educators, question your level of cultural responsiveness. Journal on Empowering Teaching Excellence, 2(2), 15-23. https://digitalc ommons.usu.edu/jete/vol2/iss2/4

Jenkins, C. (2018). Intersectional considerations in teaching diversity. In Carter, N & Vavrus, M. (Eds.), Intersectionalities of Race, Class, and Gender with Teaching and Teacher Education: Movement Toward Equity in Education. Leiden. The Netherlands: Brill/Sense. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1163/9789004365209_003

Jenkins, C., & Alfred, M. (2018). Understanding the motivation and transformation of White culturally responsive professors. Journal of Adult and Continuing Education, 24(1), 81-99. https://doi.org/10.1177/1477971417738793

Joseph, N. M., Haynes, C., Cobb, F. (Eds.). (2016). Interrogating whiteness and relinquishing power: White faculty’s commitment to racial consciousness STEM classrooms New York: Peter Lang Publishing.

Kailin, J. (2002). Antiracist education: From theory to practice. New York: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc

Kandaswamy, P. (2007). Beyond colorblindness and multiculturalism: Rethinking antiracist pedagogy in the university classroom. Radical Teacher, 80(6)

Kendi, I.X. (2019). How to Be an Antiracist. New York: One World

Kendi, I.X. (2017). Stamped from the beginning: The definitive history of racist ideas in America. New York: Bold Type Books

Kishimoto, K. (2018) Antiracist pedagogy: from faculty’s self-reflection to organizing within and beyond the classroom. Race Ethnicity and Education, 2(4), pp.540-554, DOI: 10.1080/13613324.2016.1248824

Lawrence, S. M. & Tatum, B. (1997). Teachers in transition: The impact of antiracist professional development on classroom practice. Teachers College Record, 99, 162–180

Milagros Castillo-Montoya, Joshua Abreu & Abdul Abad (2019)  Racially  liberatory  pedagogy: A Black Lives Matter approach to education. International Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education, 32(9), pp., 1125-1145, DOI: 10.1080/09518398. 2019.1645904

Oluo, I. (2019). So you want to talk about race? New York: Seal Press.

Phillips, C.B. & Derman-Sparks, L. (1997). Teaching/learning anti-racism: A developmental approach. New York: Teachers College Press.

Picower, B. (2009) The unexamined Whiteness of teaching: How White teachers maintain and enact dominant racial ideologies, Race Ethnicity and Education, 12:2, 197-215, DOI: 10.1080/13613320902995475

Pierce, Andrew J. J. (2016). Interest Convergence: An alternative to white privilege models of antiracist pedagogy and practice. Teaching Philosophy, 39(4), pp. 507–530

Saad, L.F. (2020). Me and white supremacy: Combat racism, change the world, and become a good ancestor. Naperville: Sourcebooks

Schick, C. (2000) ‘By Virtue of Being White’: Resistance in Anti-Racist Pedagogy. Race Ethnicity and Education, 3(1) pp. 83–101.

Sue, D. W. (2015) Race talk and the conspiracy of silence: Understanding and facilitating difficult dialogues on race. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley

Tatum, B.D. (2017). Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria? And Other Conversations About Race. New York: Basic Books.

Torino, G. C. (2015) Examining biases and white privilege : Classroom teaching strategies that promote cultural competence. Women & Therapy, 38(3-4) pp. 295–307

Tuitt, F. (2003b). Afterword: Realizing a more inclusive  pedagogy.  In A. Howell,  & F. Tuitt (Eds.), Race and higher education: Rethinking pedagogy in diverse college classrooms (pp. 243– 268). Cambridge, MA: Harvard Educational Review.

Tuitt, F., Haynes, C. & Stewart, S. (Eds.), (2016). Race, equity, and the learning environment: The global relevance of critical and inclusive pedagogies in higher education. Sterling, VA: Stylus

Tuitt, F., Haynes, C. & Stewart, S. (2018), Transforming the Classroom at Traditionally White Institutions to Make Black Lives Matter. To Improve the Academy, 37, pp. 63-76. doi:10.1002/tia2.20071

Wagner, A. (2005). Unsettling the academy: Working through the challenges of antiracist pedagogy. Race Ethnicity and Education, 8(3), 261-275.


Other Sources

  • 11 Ways White America Avoids Taking Responsibility for its Racism
  • The 1619 Project
  • Black Lives Matter
  • The Danger of a Single Story
  • A Guide to Coded Language in Education
  • Harvard Implicit Bias Test
  • Is Your University Racist?
  • White Supremacy Culture in Organizations
  • 2019 interview between Beverly Daniel Tatum and Robin D’Angelo on race and racism in higher ed.

 

Identifying and Managing Unconscious Bias reflection

M. Suzanne Clinton, DBA, SPHR, UCO College of Business — 

Overview and Reflection

On April 28, 2020, from 1-2:30, I attended “Identifying and Managing Unconscious Bias” with Lt. Wayland Cubit.  Since I teach Principles of Management and Organization Behavior, I was quite familiar with the terms Lt. Cubit used, their definitions, and their role in the workplace.  What I thoroughly enjoyed the most were the examples, statistics, and personal stories he provided.

In several of my classes (Principles of Management, Human Resource Management Organization Behavior), I teach a lot about cultural differences, but generally, our discussions revolve around Hofstede’s Cultural Dimensions (individualism-collectivism; uncertainty avoidance; power distance (social hierarchy) and masculinity-femininity (task-orientation vs. person-orientation, long-term orientation, indulgence versus self-restraint).  I loved Lt. Cubit’s example of serving as a police officer and stopping the folks for TPing the neighborhood, thinking that they were committing a crime of importance.  His concern was short-lived once a fellow officer explained to him the existence of TPing as part of the culture, sense of community, and even social status in the area.  What a fun story to relate to students!  However, given our current situation of COVID-19 and the national run on toilet paper, it was almost painful to see the picture of the TPed trees and yard!  Interestingly enough, COVID-19 will now always be a part of our history and culture.  Anyway, back to Hofstede, I will use this story as an introduction of students to culture before moving into the study of the differences in cultures that we conduct at the following website: https://www.hofstede-insights.com/country-comparison/

In Principles of Management, I teach that we consciously try to manage others’ perceptions so that they will have a good first impression of us.  Lt. Cubit talked about this very phenomenon and called it “covering.”  He cited statistics of those who admit covering:  83% of LGBTQ, 79% of African Americans and Hispanics, 66% of Women, and 45% of White Males (Pew Research, April 2019).  The white male statistic was what I found most interesting.  Colleagues and I have discussed the almost inappropriateness of white males to express their opinions on so many things, given the elevation of the importance of diversity in the workplace.

My class also discusses conscious and unconscious biases. Implicit bias gained the forefront of attention due to the rise in the number of deaths of African Americans by the hands of police in Ferguson, Missouri, and many other American cities.  This situation was another thing that Lt. Cubit discussed, with the example of his granddaughter wanting her Frozen cup rather than her brother’s Spider-Man cup.  He could have completed changed the course of events in his kitchen if he had just known what his granddaughter’s problem was!  I thought his story of being asked how we could prevent such occurrences in cities such as Oklahoma City was quite interesting and showed the forethought of our metropolitan leaders.

One of my most favorite Lt. Cubit quotes was about the young African American female on an international exchange who said that once overseas, she finally became unaware of her race.  How enlightening, yet heartbreaking.  I could say that I had a similar but opposite experience when I was traveling in India to recruit students for UCO.  I traveled with Dr. Epstein.  No matter where we went, he and I were the center of attention because of our (compared to them) extreme whiteness and the fact that we both have gray/white hair!  Indian children wanted their pictures taken with us.  They wanted to feel our skin to see if our skin felt like their skin.  They wanted to touch our hair.  While touring through a beautiful palace, more than one group of Indian tourists asked to have their picture taken with us.  I also had a little Indian toddler walk up and hold my hand.  She was so young and beautiful.  I could only guess that I was the whitest white person that she had probably ever seen!  As if we had not already displayed our whiteness, our hosts took us to ride an elephant.  You do this without your shoes on, so our neon white/pink feet drew even more attention.  It was only as a result of these experiences as a stranger in a strange land in India that I was able to possibly gain a small bit of understanding of what those of other races might experience when not the majority.

One of the methods I use in class to teach cultural differences and its impact on business is a group/team role play for a cultural simulation. I use this role play to provide students with an active learning experience since many have not been outside the United States.  In this simulation, the class is divided into four groups, which, in the end, HAVE to strike deals to provide land, labor, infrastructure, and hospitality to prepare a country for hosting the Olympics. Each group is given a set of rules based on Hofstede’s Cultural Dimensions (that they must follow and by which they must behave, but no one can share any of their information with any of the other groups, no matter what. To make things fun, at least one (and in most cases many) of group A’s rules (e.g., must serve everyone food) are in direct opposition to Group’s B (e.g., can’t take food from males), C (e.g., can’t take food from females) and D (e.g., at all costs, take NO food from anyone). As I am sure, you can guess, hilarity ensues. At the end of the exercise, when everyone has given up because all groups are at a stalemate because they can’t make one centimeter of progress with the other groups, the group exercise ends.

Artifact:

Having heard Lt. Cubit’s lecture, I think that I will incorporate additional assessment measures.  In addition to assessing student learning with exams, I think I will include a reflection paper on the Cultural Simulation.  For this reflection, I will use the Sentence Stems that Dr. Christy Vincent taught us about during her Service Learning Workshops. Specifically, I will provide the students with these stems to respond to:  I learned…; I was surprised…; I’m beginning to wonder…; I rediscovered…; I now better appreciate…; I feel…; I promise to…; I have become skillful at…; I uncovered a question about…; I changed my mind about…; I was proud of the way I…; and I think I will…

I researched some possibilities for assessment, and I have included them in this reflection.

Implicit Bias https://implicit.harvard.edu/implicit/

Anti-Bias Behavior https://www.adl.org/sites/default/files/documents/assets/pdf/education-outreach/Personal-Self-Assessment-of-Anti-Bias-Behavior.pdf

Cultural Pursuit Assessment

https://www.uh.edu/cdi/diversity_education/resources/activities/pdf/diversity%20activities-resource-guide.pdf

Conclusion:

I thoroughly enjoyed Lt. Cubit’s lecture.  It made me think, so I got a lot out of it.  I want to make sure my students understand the importance of managing unconscious bias, and I think the reflection activity and the assessment activities I included as part of the artifacts will be able to show that students learned.

 

Note: This reflection and artifact satisfies the 2nd Faculty Learning Outcome on active learning strategies in the UCO 21st Century Pedagogy Institute.