Book Clubs & Workshops – Summer 2022

Book Clubs  |  Workshops  |  STLR Sessions  |  Collegium  |  On Demand Sessions  |  Additional Opportunities


BOOK CLUBS – Click Here to Register! 

The fine print: Sessions are capped at 10 participants unless otherwise noted, books are provided for first 10 registrants, faculty are provided only one book per semester, and registrants are requested to attend all sessions for their enrolled group. To be eligible for 21CPI Recognitions, learning artifacts must be submitted to the facilitator within 30 days of the last session and must show evidence of meeting a Faculty Learning Outcome (FLO). See the 21CPI homepage for more details.

Intersectional Pedagogy: Complicating Identity and Social Justice, Edited by Kim A. Case  [Amazon summary]
Date(s)/Time(s):  Mondays, 3-4p, 5/16, 6/6, 6/27 [Book Provided for First 10 Registrants; No Cap on Number of Registrations]
Location(s):          Virtual (Link Provided by Facilitator to Registrants);
Facilitator(s):        Gigi Jones; Eric Kyle;
FLO(s):                   Course Design (#1); Active Learning Strategies (#2); Learning Ecosystem (#4);
STLR:                      Global and Cultural Competencies;

Creating Wicked Students: Designing Courses for a Complex World, by Paul Hanstedt [Amazon summary]
Date(s)/Time(s):    Fridays, 2-3p, 6/10, 6/17, 6/24 [Book Provided for First 10 Registrants; No Cap on Number of Registrations]
Location(s):             Virtual (Facilitator to send link to registrants)
Facilitator(s):         Dr. Leeda Copley
FLO(s):                     Course Design (#1);
STLR:                       Leadership; Research, Creative and Scholarly Activities;


WORKSHOPS Click Here to Register!

The fine print: To be eligible for 21CPI Recognitions, learning artifacts must be submitted to the facilitator within 30 days of the last session and must show evidence of meeting a Faculty Learning Outcome (FLO). See the 21CPI Homepage for more details.


(Image Source: https://www.kean.edu/news/teaching-students-lead-challenging-conversations)

Engaging Students in Difficult Conversations on Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI)
Date(s)/Time(s):  Mondays, 12:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m., 5/16 and 5/23 [No Cap on Number of Registrations]
Location(s):           In-Person (CTL 109) and Virtual (Link Provided by Facilitator to Registrants); Lunch Provided for In-Person Registrants;
Facilitator(s):        Liz Wallace Tabak & ODI Student Peer Facilitators
FLO(s):                   Learning Ecosystem (#4);
STLR:                      Global and Cultural Competencies; Leadership;


Horizontal logo graphic of Student Transformative Learning RecordSTLR TRAINING

Login to the Learning Center at https://learningcenter.uco.edu, search for “STLR” then register for the session

STLR: Tagging & Advertising Events (Support Staff)
Monday, April 25, 2022, 9:00 AM-10:00 AM; Zoom.

STLR: Module 1, Tagging & Assessing Activities (Faculty/Staff)
Tuesday, May 17, 2022; 1:30 PM-3:30 PM; Zoom | Monday, June 13, 2022; 10:00 AM-12:00 PM; Zoom | Thursday, July 14, 2022; 1:00 PM-3:00 PM; Zoom.

STLR: Module 2, Tagging & Assessing Activities (Faculty/Staff)  [prerequisite is Module 1]
Wednesday, May 18, 2022; 1:30 PM-3:30 PM; Zoom | Monday, June 13, 2022; 2:00 PM-4:00 PM; Zoom | Thursday, July 14, 2022; 3:00 PM-5:00 PM; Zoom.

STLR: Refresher Session (Faculty/Staff)  [prerequisite is Module 2]
Thursday, June 2, 2022; 1:30 PM-3:00 PM; Zoom | Wednesday, July 20, 2022; 3:30 PM-5:00 PM; Zoom.


2022 ANNUAL COLLEGIUM

Bell Tower image with words: annual collegium on college teaching practice

Wednesday, August 17, 2022, 8:30am – 3:00pm
UCO Liberal Arts Building

This 23rd Annual Collegium will feature a thoughtful keynote, dynamic breakout sessions, celebratory teaching awards, a satisfying lunch, an engaging afternoon workshop, cool prizes, and much, much more! Let us join as a community for a wonderful day of focusing on the craft of teaching and learning as we work together to improve the quality of education on our campus.

For more information, visit the Collegium site.


Photo of computer screen with Qedex platform and UCO group showing

Qedex – On Demand Faculty Development – Register Here

UCO’s Center for Excellence in Transformative Teaching & Learning will be offering 140 licenses for online, professional faculty development modules offered through QEDEX, https://www.qedex.org for 21CPI credit. Explore the myriad options, find something that interests you, and sign up for one of these limited licenses! For more information, and to request a license, please visit: https://blogs.uco.edu/tts/qedex-on-demand-learning/


Graphic with books on bookshelves with text block in front "A series of book conversations: Academic innovation for the public good"Additional Faculty Development Opportunities

We regularly receive information about other faculty development opportunities that our UCO community might be interested in. Some of these are facilitated by other UCO departments while others are hosted by colleagues from other organizations. Between our own programs and these additional ones, we hope that you will find ample opportunities to support your growth as a professional educator.

To find the latest offerings, please visit the following site: https://blogs.uco.edu/tts/additional-opportunities/


 

Engaging Students as Partners in Learning and Teaching: A Guide for Faculty

An education professor, a Scottish lecturer, and a provost walk into a bar…

Okay, okay, it wasn’t a bar.  It was a publishing house.  And I guess I don’t know for certain they actually walked.  They wrote a book.

No, scratch that, they wrote THE book on student-faculty partnerships.

Student-faculty partnerships are collaborations in the classroom based on sharing the power, sharing the learning, and sharing the risks.  While the book focuses generally on in-class collaboration, keep in mind that you could have partnerships outside of class in research, creative, or scholarly activities as well.  Through mutual trust and respect, and with clear communication, a reciprocal process is possible where students can take more autonomy over their education.  This is clearly a continuum—as a faculty member you can give as much or as little power to students as you are comfortable doing so, and different situations will obviously call for different partnerships.  On the more minimal side, it could be as simple as giving students a choice in class activities or readings one day.  On the more maximal side, you could allow students to work with you to completely design your course, or write the syllabus together the first days of class.  It can be a partnership for one day, or over the whole semester.  You could partner with only a few students (there’s a great example in Chapter 3 where a faculty member partnered with a few former students to redesign their course) or your entire classroom of students.

If you’re already sold on the idea of giving students more power over their own educations, may I gently recommend you skip right ahead to Chapters 2 and 8, which are both filled with all of those practical questions that you need to ask yourself before you start planning your future partnerships.  If you aren’t quite sold yet, see Chapter 5 for a brief but thorough summary of the educational research showing how effective partnerships are, and then bounce back to Chapter 3 to see real-world examples of what you can do.

Everyone who picks up the book needs to read Chapter 6, “Challenges of Student-Faculty Partnerships,” and Chapter 7, “Practical Strategies.”  These two chapters are really the core of their wisdom, and the most practical chapters.  You need to prepare for problems so they don’t take you by surprise, and you need to have some practical tools in your educator toolkit.  For example, will you run into students who resent having to do “your work” of educating them?  Will you hear blowback from colleagues who think this is an unproven tactic meant to lighten your workload?  Having your explanations ready will keep you sane and provide you with protection if someone decides to throw metaphorical stones at you.

Before you start your wonderful new partnerships, you do need to think about the power dynamic between yourself and your students, which can be uncomfortable for some folks.  Taking a good, hard look at the intersection of your different identities, as well as your privileges and stigmas, can help you understand why students maybe don’t feel as empowered as you think they should.  However, with the strategies from Chapter 7 in your utility belt and a little forethought, you absolutely can create successful partnerships.

Sounds good, right?  There’s even a chapter on assessment because we live in an educational system that requires grades.  You could probably start small tomorrow if you tried, right?  Talk to that brilliant student about RCSA grants, or give your students a meaningful choice in tomorrow’s class.  Imminently doable.

Now, are you ready to have your mind completely blown?  Tucked innocently into the middle of the book, where it can pop out and smack you across the face and then melt back into the rest of the monograph, is a chapter on “Program-Level Approaches” to these partnerships.  At the end of this chapter is arguably the most radical idea, coyly hiding in plain sight.  What if we gave students autonomy not just over one class, and not just with one instructor?  What if we built our major programs around this idea of partnerships?  What if we redesigned our university or higher education at large around this idea that students will earn more if they see professors as guides and trusted partners?

If we think of teaching as “community property,” as the authors absolutely do (pg. 87), who’s to say that the community ends with my classroom or yours?  We all work every day to create and recreate what we lovingly refer to as UCO, and that education belongs to everyone, not just me the faculty member or the student with their carefully-framed diploma.  Clearly, this is a radical idea, but the authors have an interesting discussion about how this could (theoretically) work.  It would require an impressive amount of institutional buy-in, real partnerships between colleges and departments, and an educational culture that is okay with taking risks, but it’s a fascinating idea.  At a time when we seem to be scraping around, looking for ways to make ourselves more marketable to students, this anti-student-as-consumer approach to empowering students could ironically be the thing that UCO has been looking for all along.

Written by Leeda Copley, Department of Sociology, Gerontology, and Substance Abuse Studies

Frequently Identified Learning Outcomes

Check out this graph showing most frequently identified learning outcomes among institutions surveyed for the report. Fifteen outcomes are shown, ranging from a high of 90% for Written Communication down to a low of 29% for Digital Literacy.

Most Frequently Identified Learning Outcomes

Source: Finley, A. & McConnell, K. D. (2022). On the same page?: Adiministrator and faculty views on what shapes college learning and student success. Washington, DC: Association of American Colleges and Universities / Hanover. Graph is from p. 8 of the report available at https://dgmg81phhvh63.cloudfront.net/content/user-photos/Research/PDFs/OntheSamePage_FINAL_2-15-22_pdftoprint.pdf

Additional Opportunities

Additional Faculty Development Opportunities…

We regularly receive information about other faculty development opportunities that our UCO community might be interested in. Some of these are facilitated by other UCO departments while others are hosted by colleagues from other organizations. Between our own programs and these additional ones, we hope that you will find ample opportunities to support your growth as a professional educator.


Coalition of Urban and Metropolitan Universities invites proposals…

Call for Proposals Open—Submit Today

The Coalition of Urban and Metropolitan Universities invites proposals for our Annual Conference, The Essential Role of Urban and Metropolitan Universities, October 23–26, 2022 in San Diego, CA.

As our institutions and communities continue to navigate a global pandemic, wrestle with a long-overdue racial reckoning, face environmental challenges, and witness the great inequality in how communities are able to respond to these challenges—we recognize that we are still in the midst of crisis. Our conference offers an opportunity to pause and reflect on how we are responding to our current moment while also looking forward as we begin to articulate how we emerge from crisis.

Conference Themes

The Essential Role of Urban and Metropolitan Universities invites presenters to reflect broadly on how the urban mission can be fully integrated into operations, structure, partnerships, and academic objectives within the following major themes. Submissions are due March 25.

  • Cultivating Resilient Campuses in the Midst of Crisis
  • Inclusive Growth and Housing
  • Industry Engagement and Entrepreneurship
  • K-16 Student Success and Support
  • Place-Based Hyperlocal Community Engagement
  • Racial Equity and Social Mobility
  • Regional Collaborations and Partnerships
  • Workforce and Talent Development

Presentation Formats

A blend of short presentations and deep-dive discussions allow for in-depth conversations and actionable next steps.

  • Community Conversations—Exploring Challenges: A presenter will lead a discussion that explores a challenge they are grappling with and wants to engage the collective experience of conference participants to help address.
  • NEW Learning & Sharing Deep Dive: Did you present at one of our Learning & Sharing Virtual Series? Wish you had more time to be in dialogue and gather feedback? This session is an opportunity to dive deeper at our in-person conference setting.
  • Mini Workshop: In these how-to-sessions, presenters will create a focused, interactive session that engages attendees on new processes, infrastructure, or policy approaches.
  • Panel Presentation: A group of panelists with diverse view points and perspectives will create a question and answer dialogue around a topic.
  • Poster Sessions: Gain significant attention for your work in a more social atmosphere.

NEW Roundtables: Roundtables are an opportunity to present a project, program, or initiative through small group discussions. During the 60-minute session, presenters are positioned at their own tables and participants rotate three different times. So presenters have three 20-minute conversations on their program or initiative.


Accomplices, Not Allies: How to be a Good Partner in Diversity, Equity, & Inclusion (DEI)

Description: Want to learn more about how to be a better partner in diversity, equity, and inclusion? Wondering how you might take action to support fellow faculty, staff, or students? Join us as we explore how to be accomplices, how to get into good trouble, and how to get past just being “woke”.

Facilitators: Alyssa Provencio, PhD and Trevor Cox, PhD

When: Apr 4, 2022 11:30 AM Central Time (US and Canada)

Register in advance for this meeting: https://uco.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJIodeCqqjovE9DU80ZkwZaGon_E1C6Az2L1

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.


Trauma-Informed and DEI Webinar Series

Please join us for a free webinar series in February on Trauma-informed Pedagogy and embodied DEI work with Prof. Anita Chari (Associate Prof. of Political Science, University of Oregon) and Angelica Singh (M.A., BCST), Co-Founders of Embodying Your Curriculum, a program that supports faculty to bring trauma-informed, embodied practices into their classrooms, personal lives, and institutions. Please send this along to any colleagues or friends who might be interested!

WEBINAR 1: How to Recognize and Move Through a Traumatic Imprint

Learn about traumatic imprinting, how to recognize an imprint is surfacing, and how to metabolize it.
Friday, Feb 18, 2022 11 am-12 pm PST

REGISTER HERE

WEBINAR 2: Engaging Our Ancestors: The Disease of Forgetting, Belonging, & The Land

Learn practices for making relationship with intergenerational trauma and understand how it lives in the land.
Friday, Feb 25, 2022 11 am-12 pm PST

REGISTER HERE


Stanford Digital Education and Trinity College Monthly Book Conversations

Stanford Digital Education and Trinity College have organized 10 monthly book conversations via Zoom with leading scholars on how higher education can affect the public good. Each event features an author of a recently published book exploring the role of colleges and universities in addressing society’s problems. An expert in the author’s field will conduct the interview, followed by questions from the audience, for these one-hour sessions. Find details and register for free at https://digitaleducation.stanford.edu/academic-innovation-public-good. Note that some sessions can count towards UCO’s Continuous Cultural Competencies credit.


 

Qedex: On Demand Faculty Development

The 21st Century Pedagogy Institute (21CPI, https://21cpi.uco.edu), part of UCO’s Center for Excellence in Transformative Teaching and Learning, is proud to offer a limited number of complimentary licenses to an on-demand faculty development platform, Qedex (https://www.qedex.org). To request a license, please complete the following form:  https://uco.co1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_4JzPX5wHIDW1MO2

For the chance to receive 21CPI credit, please do the following:

  • Complete at least 6 hours of Qedex training (as listed for each Qedex course) within the calendar year,
  • Complete your Qedex Reflective Practice Exercise for each Qedex course, relating these reflections to one or more of the FLO areas,
  • Submit this reflection(s) along with the corresponding Certificate of Achievement for each Qedex course to 21cpi@uco.edu

You may track your 21CPI credits on the downloadable 21CPI FLO Tracking Sheet (https://www.uco.edu/academic-affairs/files/cettl/21cpi-flo-tracking-sheet3.pdf). Questions? Comments? Email us at 21cpi@uco.edu. Enjoy!

Here are examples of Qedex courses that have been matched with some of the 21CPI Faculty Learning Outcomes (FLOs):

FLO #1: Course Design – Incorporating Transformative Learning Theory with evidence-based principles of teaching and learning or engaging, student-centered practices. FLO #2: Active Learning Strategies – Need to be aligned with an outcome or objective. FLO #3: Learning Assessment – Selecting an appropriate technique to measure a student learning outcome, or utilizing a STLR rubric to measure student transformative growth FLO #4: Learning Ecosystems – Optimizing the environment for learning by applying practices of inclusion, mindfully using technology, and/or incorporating the human dimension FLO #5: Academic Professionalism – Engaging in a non-21CPI professional development event to improve pedagogy, and/or improving their work-life balance.
Preparing and Creating Lesson Plans Problem Solving Tools and Techniques: Part 1 Online Learning Assessment Academic Integrity, Cheating, and Plagiarism How to Identify and Survive a Toxic Workplace
Course Planning Problem Solving Tools and Techniques: Part 2 Developing Rubrics Teaching Students with Learning Difficulties Coaching and Mentoring
Writing Learning Outcomes Student Engagement for Online Learning Assessment and Evaluation in Online Learning Teaching Online: An Inclusive learning Community Approach Managing Faculty Wellbeing
Essentials of Effective Teaching Engaging HE Students with Project-Based Learning Educational Technologies for Online Learning Establishing Health and Wellness Programs
Become a Superstar Instructional Designer Creating Service-Learning Opportunities for Students Leading Libraries in the Digital University Time Management

 

These courses can also help you to develop courses that foster student development in the Transformative Learning (STLR) Outcomes as well as support your own ongoing growth and development in these areas. Here are examples of Qedex courses that align with these Outcomes:

STLR #1:

Disciplinary Knowledge

STLR #2:

Global & Cultural Competencies

STLR #3:

Health & Wellness

STLR #4:

Leadership

STLR #5:

Research, Creative, & Scholarly Activities

STLR #6:

Service-Learning & Civic Engagement

Employability in the Curriculum Teaching Online: An Inclusive Learning Community Approach Establishing Health and Wellness Programs Coaching and Mentoring Problem Solving Tools and Techniques: Parts 1 & 2 Creating Service – Learning Opportunities for Students
Creating Socially Just Campuses with Restorative Practice How to Identify and Survive a Toxic Workplace Project Management Practical Presentation Skills
Teaching Students with Learning Difficulties Time Management Developing Effective Governing Bodies and Advisory Committees
Managing Faculty Wellbeing Leadership – Theory and Practice
Change Management

 

Book Clubs and Workshops, Spring 2022

Book Clubs  |  Workshops  |  STLR Sessions  |  On Demand Sessions  |  Additional Opportunities


BOOK CLUBS – [Registration for Summer Offerings Coming Soon!] 

The fine print: Sessions are capped at 10 participants unless otherwise noted, books are provided for first 10 registrants, faculty are provided only one book per semester, and registrants are requested to attend all sessions for their enrolled group. To be eligible for 21CPI Recognitions, learning artifacts must be submitted to the facilitator within 30 days of the last session and must show evidence of meeting a Faculty Learning Outcome (FLO). See the 21CPI homepage for more details.

 

Teaching to Transgress book coverTeaching to Transgress: Education as the Practice of Freedom [Amazon summary]
Wednesday, 1:00 p.m. – 1:50 p.m., 1/19; and Mondays, 1:00 p.m. – 1:50 p.m., 2/7, 2/28, 3/28, and 4/11 [No cap on the number of participants]
Location: Online
Facilitator: Sophia Clark  [Request to register for this one by emailing Sophia directly]
FLO #4

 

cover of the book "Teaching through challenges for equity, diversity, and inclusion (EDI)"Teaching through Challenges for Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI), by Storms, Donovan, and Williams  [Amazon summary]
[Capped at 15 and book provided for first 10 registrants; Registration is now closed for this group.]
Mondays, 1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m., 1/24, 2/7, 2/21, 3/7 and 3/21  
Location: Online
Facilitator: Jerry Green
  FLO #4

 

cover of the book "Engaging Students as Partners in Learning and Teaching: A Guide for Faculty" by Cook-Sather, Bovill, and FeltenEngaging Students as Partners in Learning and Teaching: A Guide for Faculty, by Cook-Sather, Bovill, and Felten  [Amazon summary] [Sorry, this session is now full. Please choose from one of our other exciting book clubs.]
Tuesdays, 2:15 p.m. – 3:15 p.m., 1/25, 2/8, 2/22 and 3/8
Location: Online
Facilitator: Jeff King
  FLOs #1, 3, or 4

 

cover of book "Think Again" by GrantThink Again, by Adam Grant  [Amazon summary]
Fridays, 2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m., 1/28, 2/4, 2/11, 2/18 and 2/25
Location: Online
Facilitator: Adrienne Wright
  FLO #4

 

cover of "Becoming a critically reflective teacher" by BrookfieldBecoming a Critically Reflective Teacher, by Stephen Brookfield  [Amazon summary]
Wednesdays, 12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m., 2/2, 2/16, 3/2 and 3/23
Location: Online
Facilitator:  Mark McCoy
  FLOs #1, 3, or 5

 

cover of "Critical Indigenous Studies" bookPostponed: College of Liberal Arts session
Critical Indigenous Studies: Engagements in First World Locations
, edited by Aileen Moreton-Robinson  [Amazon summary]

Time and Dates TBD
Location: TBD
Facilitators: TBD
  FLO #4

 

cover of the book "Drawing is magic" by HendrixDrawing is Magic: Discovering Yourself in a Sketchbook by John Hendrix  [Amazon summary]
Fridays, 3:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m., 2/4, 2/25, 3/25, 4/15 and 4/29
Location: Online
Facilitator:  Samuel Washburn
  FLOs #1, 2, or 4

 

cover of the book "Range" by Epstein

Range: Why Generalists Triumph in a Specialized World, by David Epstein  [Amazon summary]
Fridays, 12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m., 2/4, 2/18 and 3/4  [Lunch Provided; capped at 15 and book provided for first 10 registrants]
Location: In-Person TBD
Facilitator: Eric Eitrheim
  FLO #4

 

cover of the book "All we can save: Truth, courage, and solutions for the climate crisis"All We Can Save: Truth, Courage, and Solutions for the Climate Crisis, edited by Johnson and Wilkinson  [Amazon summary]
Tuesdays, 9:30 a.m. – 10:30 a.m., 2/8, 3/1 and 4/5
Location: In-Person TBD
Facilitators: Katrina Lacher and Alyssa Provencio
  FLOs #4 or 5

 

cover of the book "Understanding by Design Meets Neuroscience" by McTighe and WillisUnderstanding by Design Meets Neuroscience, by McTighe and Willis  [Amazon summary]
Thursdays, 2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m., 3/24, 3/31, 4/7 and 4/14
Location: Hybrid
Facilitators: Rachelle Franz and Trevor Cox
  FLO #1


WORKSHOPS[Registration for Summer Offerings Coming Soon!]

The fine print: To be eligible for 21CPI Recognitions, learning artifacts must be submitted to the facilitator within 30 days of the last session and must show evidence of meeting a Faculty Learning Outcome (FLO). See the 21CPI Homepage for more details.

 

photo of wallet, coins, and Visa credit cardEssentials of University Budgeting
Fridays, 3:00 – 4:15 p.m., 1/21 and 2/11
Location: In-Person TBD
Facilitator: Luis Montes
FLO #5

This workshop series is intended to provide an overview of general university funding and specifically how UCO is funded.  It will give an overview of the general budgeting process including a look at the UCO budget and audits.  This is not intended to be a comprehensive look at the UCO budget, but to provide a working knowledge for future discussions.

cover of workbook, "Engaging in the scholarship of teaching and learning"

Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL)
Thursdays, 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m., 1/27, 2/17 and 3/10  [Capped at 10 participants]
Location: Online
Facilitators:  Jill Lambeth and Sam Ladwig
  FLO #5

This guide provides prospective SoTL Scholars with the necessary background information, foundational theory, tools, resources, and methodology to develop their own SoTL projects, taking the reader through the five stages of the process: Generating a research question; Designing the study; Collecting the data; Analyzing the data; and Presenting and publishing your SoTL project. Each stage is illustrated by examples of actual SoTL studies, and is accompanied by worksheets to help the reader refine ideas and map out his or her next steps. The process and worksheets are the fruit of the successful SoTL workshops the authors have offered at their institution for many years.

photo of home office desk with 3 monitors and microphoneOnline Teaching Strategies, Best Practices, Challenges and Success Stories
Monday, 3/28, 11:30 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.
Location: Online
Facilitators: Suzanne Clinton, Abbie Lambert and Melody Edwards
  FLO #1

 

New Faculty session
Powerful tools for engaging students: Using formative and summative assessments to measure student learning

Friday, 4/1, 11:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.  [Lunch Provided]
Location: In-Person TBD
Facilitators: Michelle Johnson and the Center for eLearning & Connected Environments
  FLO #3

 

Successfully Supporting BGLTQ+ Students: An Interactive Student Panel
Wednesday, 4/6, 11:30 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.
Location: Online
Facilitators: Suzanne Clinton, Lindsey Churchill and Abbie Lambert
  FLOs #4 or 5

 

Picture of students in the Forensic Science Institute departmentStudents as Partners in Learning and Teaching
Friday, 4/8, 1:30 – 3:00 p.m.
Location: Hybrid
Guest speaker: Peter Felten and colleagues (Zoom); hosted by Jeff King
  FLOs #1 or 4

 


Horizontal logo graphic of Student Transformative Learning RecordSTLR TRAINING

  Login to the Learning Center at https://learningcenter.uco.edu, search for “STLR” then register for the session

STLR: Module 1, Tagging & Assessing Activities (Faculty/Staff)
Jan 21, 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.  |  Feb 15, 1:30 – 3:30 p.m.  |  Mar 25, 1:00 – 3:00 p.m.  |  Apr 18, 4:00 – 6:00 p.m.

STLR: Module 2, Tagging & Assessing Activities (Faculty/Staff)  [prerequisite is Module 1]
Jan 21, 2:00 – 4:00 p.m.  |  Feb 16, 2:00 – 4:00 p.m.  |  Mar 29, 2:30 – 4:30 p.m.  |  Apr 21, 2:00 – 4:00 p.m.

STLR: Refresher Session (Faculty/Staff)  [prerequisite is Module 2]
Jan 7, 10:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.  |  Feb 3, 1:30 – 3:00 p.m.  |  Mar 9, 12:00 – 1:30 p.m. [lunch provided]  |  Apr 15, 1:00 – 2:30 p.m.

Incorporating STLR Snapshot into Capstone Courses
Jan 19, 3:00 – 5:00 p.m.


Photo of computer screen with Qedex platform and UCO group showing

Qedex – On Demand Faculty Development – Register Here

UCO’s Center for Excellence in Transformative Teaching & Learning will be offering 140 licenses for online, professional faculty development modules offered through QEDEX, https://www.qedex.org for 21CPI credit. Explore the myriad options, find something that interests you, and sign up for one of these limited licenses! For more information, and to request a license, please visit: https://blogs.uco.edu/tts/qedex-on-demand-learning/


Graphic with books on bookshelves with text block in front "A series of book conversations: Academic innovation for the public good"Additional Faculty Development Opportunities

We regularly receive information about other faculty development opportunities that our UCO community might be interested in. Some of these are facilitated by other UCO departments while others are hosted by colleagues from other organizations. Between our own programs and these additional ones, we hope that you will find ample opportunities to support your growth as a professional educator.

To find the latest offerings, please visit the following site: https://blogs.uco.edu/tts/additional-opportunities/


 

Book Clubs and Workshops, Fall 2021

Book Clubs  |  Workshops  |  STLR Sessions


BOOK CLUBS

Front cover of author Alfie Kohn's book Ungrading- Why Rating Students Undermines Learning (and What to Do Instead)Ungrading Why Rating Students Undermines Learning (and What to Do Instead)
Facilitator: Lora Pezzell
Dates: 9/7, 9/14, 9/21
Time:  12:30 – 1:30 pm
Location: Virtual

Front cover of the book Blind Spot - Modern Biases of Good PeopleBlindspot: Hidden Bias of Good People
Facilitators: Anastasia Wickham and Trevor Cox
Dates: 9/29, 10/6, 10/20, 11/3
Time:  1:00 – 2:00 pm
Location: Virtual

Front cover of the book Advancing Online Teaching-Creating Equity-Based Digital Learning EnvironmentsAdvancing Online Teaching
Facilitators: Melody Edwards and Trevor Cox
Dates: 9/8, 9/29, 10/20, 11/10
Time:  10:30am – 12:00 pm
Location: Virtual

cover of book, Bringing the Neuroscience of Learning to Online TeachingBringing the Neuroscience of Learning to Online Teaching
Facilitators: Ed Cunliff, Kristen Gregory, and Brett King
Dates: 10/26, 11/2, 11/9, 11/16
Time:  1:00 – 2:00 pm
Location: Virtual

cover of the book Noise: A Flaw in Human Judgement

Noise: A Flaw in Human Judgement
Facilitator: Chintamani Jog
Dates: 9/10, 9/24, 10/8, 10/15
Time: 12:00 – 1:00 pm
Location: Virtual

cover of the book Radical Hope: a teaching manifestoRadical Hope
Facilitators: Katrina Lacher and Ed Cunliff
Dates: 9/22, 10/20, 11/17
Time: 12:00 – 1:00 pm
Location: Virtual

Front cover of the book Teaching and Learning STEM - A Practical GuideTeaching and Learning in STEM
Facilitators: Stephanie Jones and Amanda Waters
Dates: 9/3, 10/1, 10/22, 11/12
Time: 1:00 – 2:00 pm
Location: In-person and Virtual


WORKSHOPS

Thursday Tidbits
Facilitator: Carlie Deatherage
Dates: 9/2, 9/9, 9/16, 9/23, 9/30, 10/7, 10/21, 10/28, 11/4, 11/11, 11/18, 12/2, 12/9
Time: 12:00 – 12:30 pm
Location: Virtual

Critical Reflection: How to Create Embodied Prompts that Help Students Move from Basic Summaries Towards Deeper Internalization and Transformation
Facilitator: Camille Farrell
Dates: 9/9, 9/23, 10/7
Time: 12:00 – 1:00 pm
Location: Virtual

Successfully Supporting BGLTQ+ Students: An Interactive Student Panel
Facilitators: Suzanne Clinton; Lindsey Churchill; Abbie Lambert
Date: 9/15
Time:  12:00 – 1:30 pm
Location: Virtual

Informal Peer Observation Workshop
Facilitator: Linda Harris
Dates: 9/16, 9/30, Peer Observation Time, 11/11
Time: 2:00 – 3:30 pm
Location: Virtual

Online Teaching Best Practices, Strategies, Success Stories and Challenges
Facilitators: Suzanne Clinton; Abbie Lambert; Melody Edwards
Date: 9/22
Time:  11:30 am – 1:00 pm
Location: Virtual

 


STLR TRAINING

  Login to the Learning Center at https://learningcenter.uco.edu, search for “STLR” then register for the session of your choice.

STLR: Module 1, Tagging & Assessing Activities (Faculty/Staff)
Sept. 15, 4:00 – 6:00 pm; Oct. 22, 10 am-12 pm; or Nov. 8, 2:30-4:30 pm

STLR: Module 2, Tagging & Assessing Activities (Faculty/Staff)
Sept. 17, 9:30 – 11:30 am; Oct. 22, 2-4 pm; or Nov. 10, 1-3 pm

STLR: Refresher Session (Faculty/Staff)
Sept. 21, 3:00 – 4:30 pm; Oct. 22, 9:30-11 am; or Nov. 12, 1:30-3 pm

Incorporating STLR Snapshot into Capstone Courses
Nov. 3, 1:00 – 3:00 pm

 

2021 Collegium on College Teaching Practices

Logo graphic of 21st Century Pedagogy Institute

UCO’s annual Collegium on College Teaching Practices will be from 9 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 18, in the south wing of the College of Liberal Arts.

This event represents the academic year kickoff for the Center for Excellence in Transformative Teaching and Learning’s faculty enhancement activities. During the collegium, faculty present, attend breakout sessions and hear a keynote address as they explore, learn, share and expand their professional curiosity to enhance student learning.

Attendees may also receive credit towards their 21st Century Pedagogy Institute achievements.

Mays Imad, Ph.D., will present this year’s keynote address, “Harnessing the Power of Metacognition to Improve Student Learning.” Imad researches stress, self-awareness, advocacy and classroom community and how these relate to cognition, metacognition and lead to student learning and success.

Register for the collegium by Thursday, Aug. 12 to ensure the availability of boxed lunches.

 

 

2021 New Faculty and Adjunct Orientation and Teaching-Learning Institute

Logo graphic of 21st Century Pedagogy InstituteThe August 2021 New Faculty Orientation and the Teaching and Learning Institute will be on Wednesday, Aug. 11, from 8:00 am – 5:00 pm in the Center for Transformative Learning (CTL) Building, Rooms 117-118.

This event will include ideas for the first day of classes, aligning student learning outcomes with assessments and course content, creating a potentially transformative assignment, and how to STLR (Student Transformative Learning Record) tag an assignment.

The Adjunct Faculty Teaching and Learning Institute is also on Aug. 11, from 3:00 – 5:00 pm. Both the new full-time and adjunct faculty will meet together in the Radke Auditorium on the first floor of the CTL Building.

Register for the New Faculty Orientation by Thursday, Aug. 5 to ensure the availability of boxed lunches.

A Transformative Look at Thinking — and at Teaching Students How to Think

Science writer Annie Murphy Paul’s new book, The Extended Mind: The Power of Thinking Outside the Brain (2021), argues for expanding our view of how thinking occurs. She does not minimize what the brain does brilliantly in enabling us to ideate, find patterns, and so on, but she does point out the brain’s limitations — through no fault of its own — and, crucially, how to tap into what she calls “extra-neural resources” as a way to augment and improve what happens within the three pounds or so of gray matter encased in our craniums.

Becoming a better critical thinker, something necessary as students work toward transformative realizations, usually requires becoming better thinkers in general. In reading Paul’s descriptions of the extra-neural resources her research and practical application have confirmed, the parallels between her findings and what we work to accomplish with students are readily apparent.

In both the organization of her book and in the blog post, “How I Used My Extended Mind to Write a Book about the Extended Mind” (2021, June 1), Paul organizes her findings in a way that groups extra-neural thinking into three broad categories (pp. 8-9): 1) the feelings and movements of our bodies, 2) the physical spaces in which we learn and work, and 3) the other minds with which we interact. Examples the author provides for ways to tap into extra-neural resources include:

1)   embodied cognition (body-based thinking): use of physical manipulables (e.g., notecards, post-it notes) to spark interactivity among ideas; physical movement and exercise breaks intentionally designed as part of thinking in order to tap into benefits lasting up to two hours after the activity (increased ability to focus attention and resist distraction, and expanded working-memory capacity);

2)   situated cognition (environment-augmented thinking): the natural and built environment can enhance cognitive performance — Paul digs into the research showing that sense of ownership and control over one’s workspace supports better thinking as do cues of identity within that workspace; she delves into the research about engaging with the natural environment to boost creativity and focus; and,

3)   distributed cognition (other-interactive thinking) — referring to, among others, the work of cognitive scientist Hugo Mercier, Paul points out that many of the brain’s built-in limitations, such as cognitive biases, arise from using the brain in solitude: “Humans evolved to reason in a social setting, [Mercier] writes, and when we reason this way, many of these biases disappear” (p. 7).

One important transformative realization a university education seeks to prompt among students is the how and the why of thinking like a scientist. The Expanded Mind lays bare one way we’ve shortchanged our students in getting to this ah-ha moment if faculty have not had students engage in extra-neural learning. Paul recounts the transformative realization Nobel Prize-winning physicist Carl Wieman had when he “figured out that inducing his students to talk with one another was the key to getting them to think like scientists” (p. 10). Wieman was on to something according to Paul, whose investigation indicates that “research in the vein of the extended mind finds that experts actually do more experimenting, more testing, and more backtracking than beginners. They are more apt than novices to make skillful use of their bodies, of physical space, and of relationships with others” (Paul, 2021, p. 33).

Helping students develop better thinking skills and capacity is important in bringing them along to the transformative understandings we work to prepare them for. Yet Paul argues there is not much teacher education and faculty professional development provided about extra-neural thinking and helping students develop and use these approaches:

[There is] no instruction, for instance, in how to tune in to the body’s internal signals, sensations that can profitably guide our choices and decisions. We’re not trained to use bodily movements and gestures to understand highly conceptual subjects like science and mathematics, or to come up with novel and original ideas. Schools don’t teach students how to restore their depleted attention with exposure to nature and the outdoors, or how to arrange their study spaces so that they extend intelligent thought. Teachers and managers don’t demonstrate how abstract ideas can be turned into physical objects that can be manipulated and transformed in order to achieve insights and solve problems. Employees aren’t shown how the social practices of imitation and vicarious learning can shortcut the process of acquiring expertise. Classroom groups and workplace teams aren’t coached in scientifically validated methods of increasing the collective intelligence of their members. Our ability to think outside the brain has been left almost entirely uneducated and undeveloped (p. 18).

As faculty, we can’t ‘make’ any student have a transformative realization. We do, however, design their learning environments and scaffold their learning to increase the odds. Paul’s book provides new ideas for doing this effectively.

We can also gain new strategies for our own learning and effective thinking by reading The Extended Mind.

 

References

Paul, A. M. (2021, June 1). I’m convinced that I could not have written this book without the help of the practices detailed within it. Retrieved June 1, 2021, from https://us2.campaign-archive.com/?u=bc04df008d4705e4e77c2eb35&id=d059f959f9

Paul, A. M. (2021). The extended mind: The power of thinking outside the brain. New York, NY: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.