Category: UCO

#FlockGoals: The UCO Geese Story

UCO’s resident geese are no strangers to the spotlight. They’ve been entertaining students for years, first on campus, and now on Twitter, as @UCOGeese.

The UCO Geese Twitter account is an extremely popular student-run account, with more than 800 followers. Inside Central got an exclusive interview with the anonymous student who runs the @UCOGeese account, and he/she wants to inform students that the geese are royalty and demand to be treated as such.

This is their story.

The word on the street is that they come from a very prestigious Canadian goose family. According to our anonymous source, the UCO geese are “of a higher deity than anyone else around them,” which means that we have some seriously special geese waddling around. Sources tell us that their favorite place to hang out on campus is on top of tall buildings, so they can maintain the higher ground and establish dominance over the students – because, after all, they are better than everyone else.

It has been said that the geese establish their high-glam nests on Central’s campus, because it’s a great place to raise their royal goslings. The first order of business when they arrived on campus was to take over Broncho Lake, another flock favorite, and they’ve been slowly expanding ever since.

Did you know that every female goose can lay between 2-9 eggs? This means that we could be expecting upwards of 30 royal goslings this spring! We know that students love to interact with the geese, but @UCOGeese has warned us to please proceed with caution and give them space. They will be protecting their nests at all costs, even if it means nibbling on someone’s toe.

Though not a surprise, our source says that the UCO geese love to be fed, but they mentioned that they are on a strict no-bread diet. To stay on their good side, feed them cooked rice, birdseed or halved grapes. Please do not feed the geese bread, because it makes them sick and goes straight to their hips. They are really trying to maintain their goosley figures.

@UCOGeese says that the geese are all for making friends, as long as students are aware that they are always going to be better than them. They will be kind to those who are kind to them, unless they just feel like trolling people that day – then, you’re out of luck.

At the end of our chat, we asked about the gaggle’s goals and aspirations; we were told that their ultimate goal is to eventually take over the world. So, respect the geese, because let’s be honest. They’re definitely #SquadGoals.

New Program Celebrates Success

The first cohort of UCO Customized Education’s Workforce Advantage program received their Certificates January 13 at UCO Downtown.

The course teaches soft skills such as adaptability, integrity and effective communication methods to employees and managers seeking to improve their professional image and learn strategies for career advancement.

Through an anonymous post-course survey, one trainee said the program “will help me be a better manager to my co-workers and team member to my fellow managers,” while another person commented that it was a “fantastic class, and I would definitely recommend it to others.”

The new certificate is a direct result of Governor Mary Fallin’s “Oklahoma Works” initiative and is offered in partnership with the State Chamber of Oklahoma.

“The workforce must be developed,” said Karen Youngblood, executive director of Customized Education. “Simply taking the chance to hire another employee is no longer a viable solution. Rather than spending up to 150 percent of an employee’s annual salary to replace them, business leaders can transform their personnel into polished professionals who are valuable assets to their organization.”

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The Workforce Advantage Certificate is comprised of three modules: Personal Branding, Relationship Building and Reputation Management. Each one is designed to teach soft skills through learning activities that emphasize practical application, and the initial results demonstrate the viability of this structure.

A new cohort of the Workforce Advantage Certificate begins with Module 1, February 9-10. The training is held at UCO Downtown, located in the Carnegie Center at 131 Dean A. McGee Ave.

To register or learn more about the program, visit ce.uco.edu and click on the “certificates” icon, or call Customized Education at 405-974-3030.

UCO Alumna Starts ‘Beer Yoga’ Movement

Should you challenge your body with a yoga class, or blow it off for a beer with friends? Thanks to Brooke Larson, you don’t have to choose.

The University of Central Oklahoma alumna and former adjunct instructor at the university is the founder of Beer Yoga, a movement growing in popularity. The idea started to brew in February 2014. Larson began posting silly pictures of herself doing yoga poses with a beer in her hand on Instagram. Before she knew it, she reached 10,000 followers. Breweries then began sending her beer to pose with and her following grew to 20,000. She became a certified yoga instructor in July 2015 and Beer Yoga, LLC was born. Today she heads a thriving business with more than 30,000 Instagram followers.

The Beer Yoga experience begins with a yoga class that typically takes place in a brewery. After the class, participants have a beer and may tour the brewery.

“Beer Yoga is all about balance. Those who come to my yoga classes love that they can get a great workout in for their body and mind and afterwards they are rewarded with a tasty beverage. Even better that this takes place in a fun location that they typically have never visited in their city,” Larson said.

The classes are fun for beginner and experienced yogis alike. Larson said participants often say they are intimidated by yoga studios, so the more casual setting of a brewery puts them at ease and allows them to enjoy the class. The goal is to experience yoga in a relaxed, low pressure environment, meet people from all walks of life and discover new kinds of beer.

Larson showing off her skills via InstagramLarson is aware that some people may be a little wary of Beer Yoga but she offers these words of advice, “Just come to one class and see how they feel. Classes are geared towards all levels of physical fitness, and there is no pressure to do all the poses or drink beer. Also, beer is for after class and we will not be drinking or balancing bottles on our heads during class!”

Larson recently relocated to Denver, but says she will be back in Oklahoma to do a few classes this spring at either COOP Ale Works or The Root. If you take her class locally each participant pays $15 for an hour of yoga and one beer, but her out of state classes cost $20.

For more information, or to purchase tickets visit: www.eventbrite.com/o/brooke-larson-8363158161

A Stellar Program: UCO STLR Crosses Borders

Central’s Student Transformative Learning Record (STLR) continues to make waves in the higher education community. Institutions across both state and national borders are adopting and adapting STLR on their own campuses.

UCO’s STLR acts as a second transcript for students, recording their growth and tangible transformative learning experiences across five of Central’s six tenets: Global and Cultural Competencies, Health and Wellness, Leadership, Research, Creative and Scholarly Activities, and Service Learning and Civic Engagement.

Across the nation, Western Carolina University, in North Carolina, has begun the planning and assessment phases of their adaptation of the STLR program, which they’ve titled DegreePlus. Additionally, a team of seven from Eastern Washington University, in Washington state, will travel to UCO at the end of this month to get a firsthand look at the inner workings of the STLR program.

Internationally, Collège La Cité, in Ottawa, Canada, launched the STLR program on their campus, during the Fall 2016 semester, becoming the first institution, outside of UCO, to do so. Massey University, in New Zealand, held a webinar meeting this month for a deep dive into STLR and will send one of their deans to UCO in February, in preparation to bring a version of STLR to their campuses.

UCO Photo Services

UCO Photo Services

 

The success of STLR has been made possible by the hard work of the many faculty, staff, students and administrators that created, contributed and collaborated on the program. Because of their dedication, STLR’s goals and processes are now being valued and emulated by other organizations.

Stay connected to Inside Central for more inside looks at the STLR program and its impact on the national and international higher education communities, including  a preview into the creation of Massey University’s own set of STLR tenets.

UCO Students Dance Their Way to a Better World

University of Central Oklahoma students are brushing up on all of the latest moves for participation in BronchoThon, an 8-hour dance marathon dedicated to the many children who are assisted by Children’s Miracle Network. BronchoThon is UCO’s version of popular dance marathons done by universities throughout the nation. BronchoThon is new to UCO this semester, taking the place of Spring Sing, and will generate awareness and financial support for the Oklahoma Children’s Hospital Foundation, an affiliate of the local Children’s Miracle Network Hospital. BronchoThon will include musical entertainment, student-led activities, refreshments and, of course, dancing. At the end, everyone will celebrate the total amount of money raised.

“BronchoThon is a philanthropy composed of college students who want to make a difference and fight for the next generation. We believe that every kid should have the opportunity to dance, fight, and live. BronchoThon is how we act out on that belief.”

UCO students can sign up for BronchoThon either as an individual dancer or with an organization. The registration cost is $25 per dancer. Throughout the spring semester, students will attend benefit nights, complete tasks and fundraise to earn points. These points are called Miracle Points, and the organization that has the most Miracle Points by the night of BronchoThon will receive an award called the Miracle Cup. There is also a Miracle Cup for the individual who earns the most Miracle Points. In addition, there will be an organization that is the overall winner of BronchoThon, considered the “Overall Miracle Cup Champion.” The Miracle Cup is a great incentive, evoking healthy competition that will encourage students to raise more money for the cause.

Ride on, Bronchos

After a successful fall semester, Central’s Safe Ride program, a partnership between UCO and Uber, lives on.

For the Spring 2017 semester, students can request free rides up to $15 on the Uber app, from 9 p.m. until 3 a.m. on Thursday, Friday and Saturday nights from January until May. Students can take six trips, within the Edmond and surrounding areas, during the semester.

Are you new to Uber? No problem! Just download the Uber app and create an account profile using your @uco.edu email address. You can then enter the code UCOSPRING17 into the Promotions section of the app.

Already using Uber? You’re all set! Update your profile with your @uco.edu email address, if you haven’t done so already, and enter the code UCOSPRING17. If you participated in the program last semester, just enter the code and Uber away!

Celebrating Diversity in Scholarship

Captured in two of Central’s six tenets, global and cultural competencies and research, scholarly and creative activities are prevalent throughout the UCO campus, in both curricular and extra-curricular settings. However, one student group is celebrating its diversity, while promoting research, scholarship and creativity.

 

screen-shot-2017-01-09-at-10-55-02-amDiverse Student Scholars (DSS) is a group comprised of both undergraduate and graduate students at Central, who collaborate to conduct, present and share scholarly research to the academic community and beyond. Dr. Jeanetta Sims, assistant dean for Central’s Jackson College of Graduate Studies and a tenured associate professor in the marketing department in Central’s College of Business, began DSS in the fall of 2007, her first semester of teaching at UCO.

Taking Paws to De-Stress

College can be stressful. It’s a well-known fact that between classes, extra-curricular activities, social events and jobs, college students can experience high levels of stress.

In order to help students de-stress, Central’s Center for Counseling and Well-Being hosts a weekly event “Stress Paws” with three H.A.L.O.-certified therapy dogs each Thursday from 3-5 p.m. on the fourth floor of Nigh University Center.

Human Animal Link of Oklahoma (H.A.L.O.) was founded on the belief that dogs and humans can form wonderful and mutually-beneficial relationships. H.A.L.O. is a nonprofit organization that provides animal-assisted therapy to patients, residents and students.

“We are a Central family. My husband and I met at UCO when we were 18, and our kids were Bronchos as well,” said H.A.L.O.’s Executive Director Terri Smith.

“We love being able to partner with our Alma Mater and share our therapy dogs with its students!”

Ride-Sharing is Caring

For the Fall 2016 semester, the UCO Student Association (UCOSA) partnered with Uber to offer free rides to UCO students on the weekends. In typical college student fashion, Bronchos took full advantage of the situation. Here’s a look at what a few students had to say about their experiences:

The Singing Student

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“I frequently use the UCO Uber on Thursday, Friday and Saturday nights. It’s been great! Kept me out of a lot of trouble by making the right decision by getting one. I think it’s impacted this campus big time by reminding students that it’s okay to drink, but be safe by using Uber instead of driving!”

– Dillon, pre-med major from Newcastle, OK

Being Involved at UCO

By Riley Cole, junior strategic communication major, leadership minor

Being involved at UCO has allowed me to become connected to campus, understanding the history and richness Central embodies. I have built community like no other. I’ve discovered my passion and strengths, and built my resume more and more. So it seems, busier students do better in all areas; I’ve found this to be true.

Serving as a chapter president I’ve been stretched and strengthened more than I could have ever imagined. If it wasn’t for peers who saw potential in me and encouraged me to step up in leadership roles, I would have never had the opportunity to become a member of Sigma Phi Lambda and serve as president. This role has given me immense opportunities on campus, influence in areas I never would’ve dreamed and friendships that will last forever.

Getting involved at UCO has greatly enhanced my college experience. I would not be the leader, student, friend or sister I am if it wasn’t for the organizations I’ve invested in.

Editor’s note: Cole is a member of the following organizations:

  • Sigma Phi Lambda (president, chaplain, homecoming chair, cheer and dance choreographer and Spring Sing chair);
  • President’s Leadership Council (senior representative);
  • New Broncho Orientation (Stampede Week director); and,
  • Hooves Up (rally coordinator).