N. Korea’s secret digital world: No citizens allowed

 From BBC.com

These BBC.com headlines may seem like N. Korean is entering the 21st century, but there is one important fact that is left out: The service is NOT for residents, only foreign visitors. N. Koreans have a very limited phone and internet service that is highly controlled by the state.

North Korea: On the net in world’s most secretive nation

North Korea embraces 3G service

Press Freedom Day at UCO!

The Press Freedom class visited the Nigh to promote freedom of media. International World Press Freedom Day is May 3, but the class made April 18 an unofficial day to promote the media.

Several groups set up booths with posters people could write on, updating their “statuses.”

Mass Communication Chair Dr. Roz Miller stopped by to praise power of the press!

Dr. Miller: https://vine.co/v/bUbqEiz2XYz

Press Freedom students

https://vine.co/v/bUbA9EmEHBM

https://vine.co/v/bUbqgPJ9uQq

https://vine.co/v/bUbK1FXLE6L

https://vine.co/v/bUbZ2M6AlnQ

http://telly.com/H9517Z

http://telly.com/H95N13

http://telly.com/H96K8F

http://telly.com/H96MJ8

 

 

New York Post coverage of Boston bombings

The New York Post has been criticized this week for showing a photo of two men they implied were suspects. The Post’s response:

“Post editor Col Allan defended the newspaper’s decision to run its cover and the story, telling The Huffington Post’s Michael Calderone: ‘We stand by our story. The image was emailed to law enforcement agencies yesterday afternoon “seeking information about these men, as our story reported. We did not identify them as suspects.’ “

One of the men pictured said he has been afraid to go outside.

What do you think? Was the Post justified?

University of Central Oklahoma