At the Pussycat Motel

Eugenia, Bernard, and Ferrallion

Eugenia, Bernard, and Ferrallion

By Dr. Pamela Washington

All the characters from Act I end up at the Pussycat Motel, but a whole group of people call the Pussycat home. What type of person would live and work in a place like the Pussycat?

Owner Ferrallion and his wife Olympia (the leather lioness), represent divergent responses to violence and chaos. Perhaps because of his military experience in Korea, Ferrallion dishes out violence at every opportunity, but there is a complex psychology at play in Ferrallion. Potts was under his command in Korea, and Ferrallion seems to dish out military style violence to him, but he also continues to employ Potts even though he is an alcoholic and in some ways incompetent. The same is true with Bernard, Ferrallion’s alcoholic uncle whose moaning—well enough said about that. In Ferrallion, our playwright, Feydeau has created a very complicated psychological portrait.

Olympia was a French stripper, now married to Ferrallion and living in Scarsdale, New York, and what is a French stripper doing in Scarsdale? Come hear the story.  Her nickname implies aggressiveness, but she has some trouble dealing with the chaos that Victor, Laura, Maria, Histangua, Andrew, Edward, Antoinette, Stephens, and our good doctor, Finache, bring to the Pussycat. Fainting, crying, drooling—what brings our sophisticated Olympia to this state?

The previous maid at the Pussycat Motel was fired for bringing a camera to work—and using it! Why is college student Eugenia working at “the love motel”? What part will she play in the chaos?

Klaus, a visitor from Germany who speaks almost no English and desperately wants “a friend,” is our most elusive resident. Laura, Maria, and Antionette all visit his room—who stays to play?

When two worlds collide, who ends up in the Jungle room, who goes mad, and who survives the chaos to play another day?

At the Pussycat Motel

At the Pussycat Motel